Summer Session 2022 Courses

4 Credit Courses

Note: All are 4-credit courses, unless otherwise noted.  Courses that fulfill Goucher Commons Requirements are noted in parentheses with “GCR” and the requirement it fulfills.


BUS 160 — Personal Financial Planning
In this course, you will learn how to set personal financial goals and develop a plan for achieving them. Unlike many college-level courses, Personal Finance focuses completely on real-world decisions, some of which will be immediately applicable to your personal situation (budgeting, credit management, insurance), and others that will be relevant to you shortly after graduation (paying student loans, buying a house or car, saving, and investing). None of this is rocket science, but it does require a commitment to acquire the knowledge, skills, and decision-making tools that will help make dreams and goals a reality in the future.

Summer Session I

Synchronous Online - Monday - Friday, 9:00am - 11:40am

Instructor: Mehdi Shadaei


CPED 207 — The Addicted Brain: America’s Drug Crisis 
The opioid crisis is one of the deadliest drug epidemics in U.S. history. “Opioids” include illegal recreational drugs (such as heroin), but also powerful pain relievers often prescribed for patients with chronic medical conditions. In this course, we will dive into the neurobiology of opioid drugs, the effects they have on the brain, and how this contributes to the development of an addiction. We will also examine the many intersecting factors (education, class, race, cultural background, genetic predisposition, psychological health, and others) that influence who becomes addicted to opioids, and what help they receive. Students will then conduct collaborative investigations of a drug of their choice in a specific local or national setting (for example, methamphetamine abuse in the rural Midwest, or Ritalin abuse by urban teens), working to understand the factors influencing the abuse of this drug from social and biological perspectives. Students are limited to one CPE course per semester.

Summer Session II

Synchronous Online - Monday-Friday, 12:00pm - 2:40pm

Instructor: Gillian Starkey


EC 111 — Essentials of Economics I
You think like an economist. You just don’t realize it yet. This course will introduce you to basic concepts of economics and to give you a sense of what the field of economics is (and isn’t). Both directly and indirectly, economic theory influences your daily life; therefore, we will discuss a variety of microeconomic and macroeconomic concepts both in theory and through real world applications throughout the course. By the end of the class you will be able to apply basic economic concepts to a variety of contemporary economic issues. This course is the first sequence in a two course exposure to the fundamentals of microeconomics and macroeconomics.

Summer Session II

Asynchronous Online

Instructor: Asha Shepard


PSY 105 — Introduction to Psychology
This course provides an overview of the contemporary discipline of psychology, integrated with experiential learning activities designed to develop scientific thinking and research skills. Topics include fundamental issues in psychology, brain and behavior, perception, learning and cognition, personality theories, psychological disorders, and humanistic, developmental, and social psychologies. Students will learn the philosophical and methodological foundations of psychology as a scientific study of mind, brain, behavior, and human experience.

Summer Session I

Asynchronous Online

Instructor: Jennifer McCabe


PSY 220 — Personality Psychology
Personality refers to an individual’s characteristic patterns of thoughts, emotions, and behaviors, together with the psychological mechanisms behind these patterns. This course examines theories of personality, how personality persists and changes across the lifespan, how nature and nurture influence personality, and the measurement of personality. Prerequisite: PSY 105 or PSY 111

Summer Session I

Asynchonous Online

Instructor: Nadia Alsamadi


PSY 238 — Psychological Distress and Disorder
This course presents different approaches to understanding and conceptualizing psychological distress and disorder. The major psychological disorders will be examined in cultural context. Different theoretical perspectives will be considered, as well as the ways in which psychological disorders have been and are currently treated. Prerequisite: PSY 105 or PSY 111.

Summer Session I

Asynchronous Online

Instructor: Arlette Ngoubene Atioky


SP 120 — Elements of Spanish II
Continued development of the four basic language skills-listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing-within the context of Hispanic cultures. Four contact hours. Prerequisite: SP 110 or SP 110V with a minimum grade of C- or placement exam.

Summer Session I

Synchronous Online - Monday-Friday, 10:00am - 12:40pm

Instructor: Maria Gomis-Quinto


SP 130 — Intermediate Spanish
This course is designed to expand your knowledge of the Spanish language and explore the cultural diversity in the Spanish-speaking world through the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. This is the third and final course of the lower-division language sequence. Successful completion of this course fulfills Platforms 1 and 2 of the Foreign Language and Culture Requirement. Prerequisite: SP 120 or SP 120S or SP 120V, with a minimum grade of C- or placement exam. 

Summer Session II

Synchronous Online - Monday-Friday, 10:00am - 12:40pm

Instructor: Frances Ramos-Fontán


WRT 285 — Analyzing Linguistic Data 
This course has four main goals: to introduce students to some areas of linguistic study such as dialect variation, register analysis, and sociolinguistics; to explore some of the ways that linguists use data to learn more about language and how people use language; to examine how linguists, academics in general, and students themselves use written language; and to introduce students to the genre of scholarly linguistic writing (and academic writing more generally). Students will read scholarly and popular works in the field of linguistics; collect, analyze, present, and write about linguistic data; conduct group and individual research; and share their findings with the class. Students will learn to work with several corpora such as the Corpus of Contemporary American English and the Dictionary of American Regional English, and will also create and analyze data from their own choice of corpus. They will also analyze aspects of their own writing. The class will culminate with students developing their own research question, conducting their own research, and presenting it to the class as both an oral presentation and a paper written in the style of published linguistic research. This final paper will be a multi-draft paper, and we will conduct peer review and one-on-one conferences to help students revise their work.

(Fulfills both WEC and DA-AC GCR requirements)

Summer Session II

Synchronous Online - Monday-Friday, 1:00pm - 3:40pm

Instructor: Susan Garrett