Mileah Kromer

Associate Professor and Director of the Sarah T. Hughes Center for PoliticsPolitical Science

Dr. Mileah Kromer is an associate professor of political science and the director of the Sarah T. Hughes Center for Politics. She teaches courses on American state politics, research methods, and survey methodology in the Center for People, Politics, and Markets. In her role as director of the Sarah T. Hughes Center for Politics, she oversees every aspect of the Goucher College Poll, including questionnaire construction, sampling, and data analysis.  Her research interests include public opinion, survey research methodology, and American state politics. Her scholarly work has appeared in Social Science Quarterly, the Social Science Journal, Survey Practice, and Politics & Gender.   She is a frequent commentator on Maryland politics and has been quoted in The Washington Post, The Atlantic, NPR, and ABC News.  Her opinion writing has appeared in The Hill, CNN, The Washington Post, The Baltimore Sun, and Salon.

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Publications

Deckman, M., McDonald, J., Rouse, S., & Kromer, M. (2020). Gen Z, Gender, and COVID-19. Politics & Gender, 16(4), 1019-1027.

Kromer, M., & Parry, J. A. (2019). The Clinton Effect? The (Non) Impact of a High‐Profile Candidate on Gender Stereotypes. Social Science Quarterly, 100(6), 2134-2147.

Kromer, M., Goidel, K., & Climek, M. (2017). Does It Really Make a Fracking Difference? The Conditional Effects of Question Wording on Support for Hydraulic Fracturing. Survey Practice, 10(1).

Hogan, R. E., Kromer, M. K., & Wrzenski, R. L. (2016). Electoral Consequences of Lawmaking Activities for State Legislative Incumbents. Social Science Quarterly, 97(3), 636-649.

Cale, T., & Kromer, M. (2015). Does proximity matter? Plant location, public awareness, and support for nuclear energy. The Social Science Journal, 52(2), 148-155.

Kromer, M. (2015). Public Perceptions of Hydraulic Fracturing in Three Marcellus Shale States. Issues in Energy and Environmental Policy, 20, 1-12.

Kromer, M, & Roselle, L. (2015). Giving Credit When Credit is Due: Credit Giving to the US Congress. Journal of Legislative Studies, 22(1), 30-53.

Giovanello, S., Kirk, J., & Kromer, M. (2013). Student Perceptions of a Role-Playing Simulation in an Introductory International Relations Course. Journal of Political Science Education, 9(2), 197-208.

Conference Papers & Panel Participation

Kromer, M. & Aylward, A. (2016) Women’s Representation in the State Legislature and Trust in State Government. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association, Philadelphia, PA.

Kehoe, G., Kasniunas, N., & Kromer, M. (2015) The Rhetoric of U.S. Senators during the 2013 Government Shutdown: Examining Gendered Differences in Position-Taking over Twitter. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association, Chicago, IL.

Kromer, M. & and Parry, J. (2013). High-Profile Female Politicians and Perceptions towards Women in Public Office. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association, Chicago, IL.

Goidel, K., Climek, M., Brou, L., & Kromer, M., (2013) Does It Really Make a Fracking Difference? Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Association for Public Opinion Research, Boston, MA.

Kromer, M. & Roselle, L. (2012) Giving Credit When Credit is Due? The Death of Osama bin Laden and Credit Giving in the US House of Representatives. Paper Presented at the Annual Meeting of the Southern Political Science Association. New Orleans, LA.

Cale, T. & Kromer, M. (2011) Does Proximity Matter? Perceptions of Nuclear Energy in North Carolina—Paper presented at the Annual Southern Association for Public Opinion Research Conference. Raleigh, NC.

Academic or Professional Associations

Association of Academic Survey Research Organizations

American Association for Public Opinion Research