Environmental Certificates

Advance your career with flexible professional certificates focused on the skills you need. 

Climate Change Education

Post-baccalaureate certificate

This certificate in Climate Change Education targets environmental educators, both formal and informal, who face the challenges of understanding and explaining the complexity of the science and phenomena underlying climate change, the disparate, duplicative, and often competitive policy initiatives, the contentious politics, and range of behavior and beliefs surrounding climate change. 

CERTIFICATE APPLICATION

Program Details
Credits 12
Timeline 12 Months
Next start date June 1
Post-baccalaureate Certificate Cost $6,000

Course Descriptions

Required Courses

ENV 637: Environmental Change: Causes and Impacts (3 credits)
This course examines the driving forces and impacts of a variety of environmental challenges, and geophysical and geopolitical ties that bind communities together around the world.  Students will better understand the social, economic, and biological landscape that we face globally today.  They will also understand how these forces of environmental change also fuel conflicts, public health issues, poverty, and vulnerability in communities.  Case studies of successful mitigation and resilience will be provided and discussed to provide students with awareness and appreciation for what is being done in response to these issues.

ENV 605: Climate Change: Science and Society (3 credits)
This course offers an integrative approach to climate change, providing an overview of the complex and multidisciplinary sciences underpinning climate science and it challenges to social and political accommodation.  As social and political implications of climate change have become increasingly apparent and communities across the globe struggle with impacts that include extreme weather and denial of causes, this course is designed to teach students to sort through the scientific, social, and political commitments of climate change and assess competing theories of change.    

Environmental Studies Electives

ENV 639: Citizen Science (3 credits)
The purpose of this course is to engage environmental educators in expanding fields of citizen science, volunteer environmental monitoring, and public participation the process of scientific investigations. Students will explore the foundations of citizen science project design, implementation, and analysis, to build skills as current and future citizen science project leaders.

ENV 612: Energy, Natural Resource Management, and the Environment (3 credits)
This course covers a wide spectrum of topics on energy and natural resource management from a public-policy and environmental-affairs approach.  In the course students will investigate the politics, economics, and impacts of renewable and fossil-fuel energy sources, energy policy, energy efficiency, waste, restoration, environmental technology, public finance and investment, and environmental law and regulations.

ENV 618: Environmental Education (3 credits)
This course investigates the role of education in solving environmental problems and developing environmental literacy.  Students will explore models of environmental education, how it manifests across sectors (in nonprofit, academic, for-profit and government contexts), best practices in environmental education program planning, and community-based environmental education. 

ENV 627: Environmental Social Science (3 credits)
This course is designed to introduce students to environmental social science approaches and concepts, including: the relationship between society, politics, and the environment; social processes and their iterative and reciprocal effects on the environment; factors that shape interactions between humans and the environment; the challenges and implications of decision making, policy, and governance; and social science research methods applied to environmental issues. 

ENV 634: Environment, Development, and Economics (3 credits)
This course examines how natural resources intersect with social and economic-development initiatives.  We will review the different kinds of natural resources and review case studies of both successes and failures in regard to sustainable use and community benefits.  Special attention will be paid to community-based initiatives and examples of inclusive decision making and policy design.

ENV 640: Risk and Society (3 credits)|
This course introduces students to the field of environmental risk and its construction and representation as a complex of interweaving ecological, social, economic, statutory and political factors.  The course will consider the process of risk assessment and analysis, as well as risk communication and management, in contexts such as public administration and public health.

ENV 689: Independent Study (1-4 credits)
This option allows students to determine and submit a self-directed research and/or creative project. Students will present a statement of rationale to the academic director for approval based on the value of the study within the student's overall educational objectives for the certificate program.

ENV 690: Environmental Practicum (3 credits)
The practicum is a semester-long applied learning opportunity for students enrolled in an Environmental Studies certificate program to partner with individuals and organizations directly involved in developing or delivering programs, curricula, policy, or research.  The practicum will be designed to meet the student’s educational goals within the topical framework of the certificate program.  Students will enroll individually or with other members of their cohort and will work under the supervision of qualified individuals in the partnering organization.

Cultural Sustainability Program Electives

CSP 630: Community and Economic Development (3 credits)
A critical feature of cultural sustainability is the development of strategies that align with economic vitality and benefit cultural practitioners. This course surveys, analyzes, and evaluates efforts of this nature: cultural tourism, schools, marketing initiatives for cultural products, and other forms of entrepreneurship. 

CSP 642: Culture and Calamity (3 credits)
There are physical, psychological, social, and cultural dimensions to upheavals in community life, whether caused by war, economic or environmental devastation, forced displacement, or even policy. Human expression, even in the most authoritarian states and in the direst hours of crisis, cannot be silent. This course will examine the cultural and artistic aspects of upheaval and conflict around the world, including the destruction of traditional culture and emergence of new forms and voices. Case studies and readings will examine culture as a reflection and record of upheaval and as a creative response to it.

Management Curriculum Electives

PMGT 601:  Leadership and Self-development I: Leadership Styles (3 credits)
This course will help students define leadership styles and set personal goals. Students will integrate conceptual knowledge and self-awareness within the context of ethical practice, social responsibility, and innovative practice. 

PMGT 630: Designing and Delivering a Learning Experience (1.5 credits)
This course will engage students in preparing for, planning, and delivering a learning experience. Topics will include analyzing and targeting a specific audience; choosing appropriate teaching methods for a given audience; developing and producing content; facilitating discussions; and using an array of top technology tools. Participants will be introduced to prominent theories of teaching and learning, and will be challenged, throughout the course, to integrate the theories in practical applications. Emphasis is on relevancy to a participant's field of study. The course will culminate in participants delivering an impactful learning experience in a face-to-face or online environment, or other medium of their choice.

PMGT 611: Communications (3 credits)
This course gives an overview of the elements of effective professional communications: clear, concise writing; successful public relations strategies; advertising; traditional and current marketing principles; crisis management; and use of emerging technologies such as social media. This course will explore these communications elements as they apply to nonprofit organizations, arts organizations, and self-promotion.

PMGT 608: Principles of Project Management (3 credits)
This course is intended as an overview, describing the fundamental principles, processes, knowledge areas, and tools and techniques of project management.  Students will learn how to manage the "faster, better, cheaper" pressures that most organizations face. Topics include the project management life cycle, selecting projects, project planning, quality management, and controlling projects.


Environmental Communication and Collaboration

Post-baccalaureate certificate

This 12-credit certificate program provides education and media professionals graduate level knowledge and training to develop skills and leadership with environmental communication and collaboration. The certificate is designed to provide professionals working in different capacities, formally and informally (curators, writers, journalists, conservationists, naturalists, park rangers, etc.), the tools to evaluate, communicate, and collaborate with stakeholders and members of the public on complex environmental issues.  Courses focus on critical evaluation of environmental claims, different ways of knowing, community-based knowledge and citizen science, and methods to document, assess, and produce environmental knowledge.

CERTIFICATE APPLICATION

Program Details
Credits 12
Timeline 12 Months
Next start date June 1
Post-baccalaureate Certificate Cost $6,000

Course Descriptions

Required Courses

ENV 615: The Environment & the Media (3 credits)
This course introduces students to the role of the media and communications in articulating environmental claims, issues, and challenges. It explores techniques for communicating across social and political differences, expressing complex technical issues, mediating contentious issues, and managing crisis rhetoric.  Students develop critical thinking for understanding multiple points of view, developing scientific literacy, and identifying sources and forms of bias and misrepresentation.  Students will evaluate popular environmental discourse and analyze environmental rhetoric.

ENV 624: Systems Thinking and Evaluating Claims for Environmental Research (3 credits) 
This two-part research and methods course provides students the tools and critical thinking to interpret, evaluate, communicate, and use scientific-research findings as well as design and conduct social science research projects. Systems Thinking and Modeling introduces students to the concept of systems thinking, design thinking, nonlinear dynamics, thresholds, uncertainty and surprise, and the importance and application of feedback loops in ecosystems, built-environment impacts, and human ecology.  Evaluating Claims presents case studies and critical analysis of research claims by examining the premises, logic, and application of method, as well as the validity and quality of the data.  Students will develop quantitative literacy for understanding scientific models (mathematical, population dynamic, and dimensional) and their underlying principles and notational conventions as tools that organize data, define parameters, clarify processes, and enable predictions.

Environmental Studies Electives

ENV 622: Environmental Justice (3 credits)
This course examines environmental inequity, in particular how race and socioeconomic status are related to environmental problems faced by communities. We will investigate patterns of environmental inequity, injustice, and racism as well as grassroots and community-based efforts to deal with environmental threats.

ENV 630: Public Participation (3 credits)
This course introduces students to the critical role of public engagement with issues that have a bearing on communities directly affected by adverse environmental impacts, such as environmental health, food security, and resource allocation.  It will build upon approaches and topics studied in other offerings in this curriculum on social science methods, governance, and environmental justice.  We will examine power and stakeholders, learning to map the scope of interests and spheres of influence of stakeholders and developing the practical skill at managing a stakeholder process.  We will survey different types of public participation in the political process, including public comment, community organization, citizen science, and the co-production of knowledge.  This course emphasizes practical application of public engagement and participation techniques in the context of heterogeneous communities with different cultural worldviews and priorities. 

ENV 621: Environmental Governance (3 credits)
This course approaches environmental governance from a multi-level perspective, including community-based environmental management, and policy and governance structures formally represented in institutions as well as adaptive and emergent forms shaped in response to decentralized negotiations over decisions and access to resources.  In addition to this multilevel framework, the course will focus on the process of policy making, decision analysis, the problem of scaling, and the techniques of scenario planning.  It will present basic concepts and illustrate real-world concerns in case studies. 

ENV 623: Environment, Culture, and Community (3 credits)
This course explores the interrelations and interdependencies of environment, culture, and community.  Beginning with the current state of the world and its sustainability crisis, we will explore global environmental issues and topics, focusing on cultural and community impacts.  Students will be exposed to a range of domestic, international, rural, and urban theaters of conflict and change, as well as the complex political, social, scientific, and methodological challenges of working at the intersection of environment, culture, and community. 

ENV 634: Environment, Development, and Economics (3 credits)
This course examines how natural resources intersect with social and economic-development initiatives.  We will review the different kinds of natural resources and review case studies of both successes and failures in regard to sustainable use and community benefits.  Special attention will be paid to community-based initiatives and examples of inclusive decision making and policy design.

ENV 640: Risk and Society (3 credits)|
This course introduces students to the field of environmental risk and its construction and representation as a complex of interweaving ecological, social, economic, statutory and political factors.  The course will consider the process of risk assessment and analysis, as well as risk communication and management, in contexts such as public administration and public health.

ENV653 Community-Based Conservation
This course addressed how communities become effective stewards of their environment, history, or culture.  How do groups and institutions learn their way forward to address complex problems with uncertain outcomes? These are core questions to guide us towards a dynamic understanding of theoretical and applied concepts of collective action in conservation. Grounded in conservation history, this course traces the development of complicated ideas concerning our perception of nature and heritage. We’ll examine case studies that demonstrate the complexities of managing common pool resources and protecting cultural identities. Participants will have an opportunity to examine a conservation community in their home region to share with each other. We will learn how to evaluate CBC’s and think strategically about ensuring long-term stewardship. This course will provide participants with opportunities get involved with or start a CBC project of their own.

ENV 639: Citizen Science (3 credits)
The purpose of this course is to engage environmental educators in expanding fields of citizen science, volunteer environmental monitoring, and public participation the process of scientific investigations. Students will explore the foundations of citizen science project design, implementation, and analysis, to build skills as current and future citizen science project leaders.

ENV 689: Independent Study (1-4 credits)
This option allows students to determine and submit a self-directed research and/or creative project. Students will present a statement of rationale to the academic director for approval based on the value of the study within the student's overall educational objectives for the certificate program.

ENV 690: Environmental Practicum (3 credits)
The practicum is a semester-long applied learning opportunity for students enrolled in an Environmental Studies certificate program to partner with individuals and organizations directly involved in developing or delivering programs, curricula, policy, or research.  The practicum will be designed to meet the student’s educational goals within the topical framework of the certificate program.  Students will enroll individually or with other members of their cohort and will work under the supervision of qualified individuals in the partnering organization.

Cultural Sustainability Program Electives

CSP 615: Cultural Partnership (3 credits)
What are effective strategies for scholars and organizations to work with communities to help develop the capacity for those communities to make choices about what matters to them? This course explores ways that effective enduring partnerships and programs can be developed to reflect the voices and aspirations of communities, their stakeholders, and the cultural organizations that serve them. CSP 610: Introduction to Cultural Documentation (3 credits) Cultural documentation provides an orientation and foundation in the methodologies used to understand and engage with the cultural processes and assets of value to communities. This course introduces best practices in cultural documentation, the use of ethnographic fieldwork and digital media to record and understand culture, and the ethical and practical issues involved in appropriately and effectively engaging with people in a variety of community contexts.

CSP 628: Principles of Cultural Mediation (3 credits)
Without the recognition of difference of opinion, viewpoints, and individual value systems, conversations around divisive issues can often be dominated by polarized and destructive debate. Creating a space for dialogue can allow for these multiple viewpoints to be shared. Students will reflect on how their own cultural background frames their understanding of themselves and others, and will develop an understanding of how intercultural dialogue and mediation can be utilized to work successfully and ethically in partnership with communities.

CSP 650: Organizing Communities: Advocacy, Activism, and Social Justice (3 credits)
This course introduces students to the methods and perspectives of community organizing. Cultural sustainability is often a matter of social justice and self-determination, and knowledge of community organizing strategies provides a critical tool for Cultural Sustainability practitioners. Organizing, advocacy, and action strategies will be shared and assessed particularly as they pertain to matters of cultural democracy.

CSP 648. Museums and Communities (3 credits)
Today's museums are re-considering their civic missions and practices, the ways they engage new partners and audiences, and, therefore, their priorities. Many believe that the health of museums depends on becoming more civically engaged with a range of communities. Successful museums engage in dialogue about civic empowerment and often center on issues of how and where citizens seek and engage each other, about their senses of power, trust, and agency. This cornerstone course encompasses the unique and critical issues of working in today's museums and offers strategies for connecting museums with communities in ways that position them as principal players in cultural sustainability.

Management Curriculum Electives

PMGT 601:  Leadership and Self-development I: Leadership Styles (3 credits)
This course will help students define leadership styles and set personal goals. Students will integrate conceptual knowledge and self-awareness within the context of ethical practice, social responsibility, and innovative practice. 

PMGT 611: Communications (3 credits)
This course gives an overview of the elements of effective professional communications: clear, concise writing; successful public relations strategies; advertising; traditional and current marketing principles; crisis management; and use of emerging technologies such as social media. This course will explore these communications elements as they apply to nonprofit organizations, arts organizations, and self-promotion.

PMGT 641: Social Networks and New Media (1.5 credits)
Introduction to using online social networks and emerging new media to engage in community building, whether it is around a cause, interest group or a business. This course introduces students to the concepts related to virtual communities and social capital. It starts by examining the impact that new media has had on culture, politics, traditional media, commerce and relationships. From there it explores the rapidly changing tools for collaboration, curation, consensus building and social media marketing in an online environment. Lastly, the course examines the ethical, legal and provenance issues that arise. Part theory, part sociology with a mixture of business and marketing strategy, students will walk away with their own actionable social media campaigns. 

PMGT 614: Integrated Marketing Communications (3 credits)
A strong brand authentically represents an organization's vision and culture while also conveying key messages. Integrated marketing communications (IMC) strategies focus on building brands by developing relationships with customers. The focus of this course is on how to develop a strategic communications plan that is integrated across media both online and offline to create a consistent and seamless experience. Students will formulate and analyze promotional goals; develop a creative media plan; select appropriate channels for relevant audiences; and evaluate the effects and results of a campaign to determine its success. This course will use examples from social marketing and cause marketing that address social issues relating to health, environment, and community  

PMGT 643: Writing for Different Audiences (3 credits)
This course gives an overview of the elements of effective professional communications, including writing clear, concise copy; communicating ideas across a platform of mediums; and identifying and writing to specific audiences. This course will explore these communications elements as they apply to nonprofit and entrepreneurial organizations, arts organizations, and self-promotion.


Environmental Education and Leadership

Post-baccalaureate certificate

This certificate program provides education professionals graduate level knowledge and training to develop and enhance environmental education and leadership skills.  It is aimed at secondary teachers but also other professionals working in environmental education in different capacities, formally and informally, including administrators, curators, writers, conservationists, naturalists, and park rangers, among others.

CERTIFICATE APPLICATION

Program Details
Credits 12
Timeline 12 Months
Next start date June 1
Post-baccalaureate Certificate Cost $6,000

Course Descriptions

Required Courses

ENV 618: Environmental Education (3 credits)
This course investigates the role of education in solving environmental problems and developing environmental literacy.  Students will explore models of environmental education, how environmental education manifests across sectors (in nonprofit, academic, for-profit and government contexts), best practices in environmental-education program planning, and community-based environmental education. 

ENV 641: Farm- and Forest-Based Education
This purpose of this course is to foster a deeper understanding of Mid-Atlantic forests and farms as dynamic educational resources to teach concepts of sustainability and issues of environmental and global climate change. Students will explore effective place-based learning models in farm-based education and forest school methodology, with an emphasis on integrated curriculum across content areas, service-based learning, and conservation education.

Environmental Studies Electives

ENV 638: Human Dimensions of Food Systems and Landscapes (3 credits)
This course integrates agricultural, ecological, and social-systems thinking to address sustainable and ethical food systems concepts in environmental education. Students will learn how to analyze and apply food systems issues through the lens of educational resources and curriculum that help build knowledge and grounding in engagement with local communities and organizations.

ENV 639: Citizen Science (3 credits)
The purpose of this course is to engage environmental educators in expanding fields of citizen science, volunteer environmental monitoring, and public participation the process of scientific investigations. Students will explore the foundations of citizen science project design, implementation, and analysis, to build skills as current and future citizen science project leaders.

CPDV 9500.ONL: Infusing Agriculture in the Elementary Classroom (CPD/MSDE credit)
In the classroom, agriculture supports and connects to nearly every subject area. This hybrid course provides opportunities and resources to infuse agricultural concepts into elementary lessons planned around the Common Core State Standards, Environmental Literacy Standards, and Next Generation Science Standards. 

ENV 610: Cultural Geography and Land Management (3 credits)
The course surveys basic concepts in geography, including cultural-settlement patterns, land-use patterns, sense of place, populations and demographics, regionalization, agriculture and rural development, urbanization and industrialization, the political economy of natural resources, and the social production of space.  The course explores these topics in the framework of land-use policy and management and illustrates the use of legal instruments such as conservation easements, political structures such as protected areas and bio reserves, economic incentives in ecotourism, and digital technologies such as geographic information systems (GIS). 

ENV 612: Energy, Natural Resource Management, and the Environment (3 credits)
This course covers a wide spectrum of topics on energy and natural resource management from a public-policy and environmental-affairs approach.  In the course, students will investigate the politics, economics, and impacts of renewable and fossil-fuel energy sources, energy policy, energy efficiency, waste, restoration, environmental technology, public finance and investment, and environmental law and regulations.

ENV 634: Environment, Development, and Economics (3 credits)
This course examines how natural resources intersect with social and economic-development initiatives.  We will review the different kinds of natural resources and review case studies of both successes and failures in regard to sustainable use and community benefits.  Special attention will be paid to community-based initiatives and examples of inclusive decision-making and policy design.

ENV 637: Environmental Change: Causes and Impacts (3 credits)
This course examines the driving forces and impacts of a variety of environmental challenges, and geophysical and geopolitical ties that bind communities together around the world.  Students will better understand the social, economic, and biological landscape that we face globally today.  They will also understand how these forces of environmental change also fuel conflicts, public health issues, poverty, and vulnerability in communities.  Case studies of successful mitigation and resilience will be provided and discussed to provide students with awareness and appreciation for what is being done in response to these issues.

ENV653 Community-Based Conservation
This course addresses how communities become effective stewards of their environment, history, or culture. Grounded in conservation history, this course traces the development of complicated ideas concerning our perception of nature and heritage. The course examines case studies that demonstrate the complexities of managing common pool resources and protecting cultural identities. Participants will have an opportunity to examine a conservation community in their home region to share with each other. We will learn how to evaluate CBC’s and think strategically about ensuring long-term stewardship. This course will provide participants with opportunities get involved with or start a CBC project of their own.

ENV 689: Independent Study (1-4 credits)
This option allows students to determine and submit a self-directed research and/or creative project. Students will present a statement of rationale to the academic director for approval based on the value of the study within the student's overall educational objectives.  Variable credits in the Independent Study allow it to be used as a full elective or paired with another 1.5 credit course to accumulate sufficient credits for the certificate.

ENV 690: Environmental Practicum (3 credits)
The practicum is a semester-long applied learning opportunity for students enrolled in an Environmental Studies certificate program to partner with individuals and organizations directly involved in developing or delivering programs, curricula, policy, or research.  The practicum will be designed to meet the student’s educational goals within the topical framework of the certificate program.  Students will enroll individually or with other members of their cohort and will work under the supervision of qualified individuals in the partnering organization.

Cultural Sustainability Program Electives

CSP 640: Exhibits, Real and Virtual (3 credits)
Museum exhibitions, publications, websites, and other media provide powerful tools for sustaining, strengthening, and showcasing the cultural assets and practices of communities for purposes of education, advocacy, and preservation.  Students explore the use of text, image, video, and sound in effectively telling the story of themes and issues that matter to communities.

CSP 648: Museums and Communities (3 credits)
Today's museums are re-considering their civic missions and practices, the ways they engage new partners and audiences, and, therefore, their priorities. Many believe that the health of museums depends on becoming more civically engaged with a range of communities. Successful museums engage in dialogue about civic empowerment and often center on issues of how and where citizens seek and engage each other, about their senses of power, trust, and agency. This cornerstone course encompasses the unique and critical issues of working in today's museums and offers strategies for connecting museums with communities in ways that position them as principal players in cultural sustainability. 

CSP 642: Culture and Calamity (3 credits)
There are physical, psychological, social, and cultural dimensions to upheavals in community life, whether caused by war, economic or environmental devastation, forced displacement, or even policy. Human expression, even in the most authoritarian states and in the direst hours of crisis, cannot be silent. This course will examine the cultural and artistic aspects of upheaval and conflict around the world, including the destruction of traditional culture and emergence of new forms and voices. Case studies and readings will examine culture as a reflection and record of upheaval and as a creative response to it. 

Management Curriculum Electives

PMGT 601:  Leadership and Self-development I: Leadership Styles (3 credits)
This course will help students define leadership styles and set personal goals. Students will integrate conceptual knowledge and self-awareness within the context of ethical practice, social responsibility, and innovative practice. 

PMGT 630: Designing and Delivering a Learning Experience (1.5 credits)
This course will engage students in preparing for, planning, and delivering a learning experience. Topics will include analyzing and targeting a specific audience; choosing appropriate teaching methods for a given audience; developing and producing content; facilitating discussions; and using an array of top technology tools. Participants will be introduced to prominent theories of teaching and learning, and will be challenged, throughout the course, to integrate the theories in practical applications. Emphasis is on relevancy to a participant's field of study. The course will culminate in participants delivering an impactful learning experience in a face-to-face or online environment, or other medium of their choice.

PMGT 608: Principles of Project Management (3 credits)
This course is intended as an overview, describing the fundamental principles, processes, knowledge areas, and tools and techniques of project management.  Students will learn how to manage the "faster, better, cheaper" pressures that most organizations face. Topics include the project management life cycle, selecting projects, project planning, quality management, and controlling projects.