Historic Preservation Certificates

Advance your career with flexible professional certificates focused on the skills you need. 

Fieldwork & Documentation

Post-master's certificate

This flexible certificate provides advanced skills for allied professionals in the field. Students will learn basics in historic preservation with a focus on documentation and cultural heritage. 

Certificate Application

Program Details
Credits 12
Timeline 12 months
Next start date August 26, 2019
Post-master's Certificate Cost $6,000

Course Descriptions

Required Courses

HP 631 Historic Property Documentation (3 credits)
Documentation techniques for cultural heritage including research methods, preparation of narrative descriptions and statements of significance, and on-site investigations and evaluation.  Instructor: Melanie Lytle

HP 633 Cultural Landscape Theory (3 credits)
This course explores the cultural landscape idea as a complex of understandings of societies’ interrelationship with the physical and social world.  Course exercises and readings challenge us to use that understanding within American preservation practices to address a central question:  How will individual and social human interaction inform the identification, protection, and ongoing use of the landscape?  Instructor: Bryan Orthel

Electives in Historic Preservation

HP 601 Introduction Pt 1: Fundamental Concepts in Heritage Preservation (3 credits)
Provides an overview and history of historic preservation practices in the United States, challenging students to think critically about how practices and policies might evolve to serve additional constituencies in the future. Students explore how the work of preservation serves various American groups, supports the maintenance of a varied built environment with a sense of place, and contributes to the varied agendas of collective memory.  Instructor: Betsy Bradley

HP 635  Preservation Law (3 credits)
Examines the federal, state, and local laws concerning historic preservation, including tax laws and real estate opportunities (and easements for structures, open areas and historic monuments, locations, and other nationally recognized properties). Additionally reviewed are current developments in historic preservation law litigation, recent decisions in the “takings” area and other constitutional developments relating to landmarking of properties. Instructor: William Cook

HP 623 Preservation Economics (3 credits)
Exploration of the economics of preservation including the impact of preservation programs and activities on a national, state and local level and the feasibility of individual preservation projects.  Instructor: Kennedy Smith

HP 610 American Architecture and Building (3 credits)
Provides a background in architecture and building in the United States, beginning with the colonial period and proceeding in chronological units to the present.  Students explore the buildings and structures built by the entire cross section of Americans within a context of social, cultural, and political development, with emphasis the foundation of American architectural history as it pertains to the practice of historic preservation.  Instructor: Kimberly Gant

Electives in Cultural Sustainability

CSP 610 Introduction to Cultural Documentation (3 credits)
Cultural documentation provides an orientation and foundation in the methodologies used to understand and engage with the cultural processes and assets of value to communities. This course introduces best practices in cultural documentation, the use of ethnographic fieldwork and digital media to record and understand culture, and the ethical and practical issues involved in appropriately and effectively engaging with people in a variety of community contexts.  Instructor: TBD

CSP 615 Cultural Partnership (3 credits)
What are effective strategies for scholars and organizations to work with communities to help develop the capacity for those communities to make choices about what matters to them? This course explores ways that effective enduring partnerships and programs can be developed to reflect the voices and aspirations of communities, their stakeholders, and the cultural organizations that serve them. Instructors: Lisa Rathje and Selena Morales

CSP 630 Community and Economic Development (3 credits)
A critical feature of cultural sustainability is the development of strategies that align with economic vitality and benefit cultural practitioners. This course surveys, analyzes, and evaluates efforts of this nature: cultural tourism, schools, marketing initiatives for cultural products, and other forms of entrepreneurship.  Instructor: Rebecca Hill

CSP 640 Exhibits, Real and Virtual (3 credits)
Museum exhibitions, publications, websites, and other media provide powerful tools for sustaining, strengthening, and showcasing the cultural assets and practices of communities for purposes of education, advocacy, and preservation.  Students explore the use of text, image, video, and sound in effectively telling the story of themes and issues that matter to communities. Instructor: Robert Forloney

CSP 635 Interpretive Planning and Project Management (3 credits)
This class provides insight and guidance into the planning and implementation of cultural programming at museums and similar organizations.  Students will explore best practices and current issues pertaining to the development of interpretive approaches and their concrete implementation in these settings. Instructor: Melissa McLoud

CSP 648 Museums and Communities (3 credits)
Today's museums are re-considering their civic missions and practices, the ways they engage new partners and audiences, and, therefore, their priorities. Many believe that the health of museums depends on becoming more civically engaged with a range of communities. Successful museums engage in dialogue about civic empowerment and often center on issues of how and where citizens seek and engage each other, about their senses of power, trust, and agency. This cornerstone course encompasses the unique and critical issues of working in today's museums and offers strategies for connecting museums with communities in ways that position them as principal players in cultural sustainability.  Instructor: Melissa McLoud

CSP 660 Oral History (3 credits)
This course provides training in best practices in oral history documentation. Through hands on instruction and mentorship with oral history practice, students will develop the knowledge and skills to professionally conduct oral history research.  Instructor: Linda Shopes

CSP 650 Organizing Communities: Advocacy, Activism, and Social Justice (3 credits)
This course introduces students to the methods and perspectives of community organizing. Cultural sustainability is often a matter of social justice and self-determination, and knowledge of community organizing strategies provides a critical tool for Cultural Sustainability practitioners. Organizing, advocacy, and action strategies will be shared and assessed particularly as they pertain to matters of cultural democracy.  Instructor: Sue Eleuterio

CSP 642 Culture and Calamity (3 credits)
There are physical, psychological, social, and cultural dimensions to upheavals in community life, whether caused by war, economic or environmental devastation, forced displacement, or even policy. Human expression, even in the most authoritarian states and in the direst hours of crisis, cannot be silent. This course will examine the cultural and artistic aspects of upheaval and conflict around the world, including the destruction of traditional culture and emergence of new forms and voices. Case studies and readings will examine culture as a reflection and record of upheaval and as a creative response to it.  Instructor: Michael Shepard; Various

Electives in Management

PMGT 606 Managing an Organization (3 credits)
This course explores the fundamentals of managing a small or medium-sized organization.  Ethics and social responsibility, legal principles, building and leading a team, business/organizational planning and development, human resource and diversity issues, and international market implications will be covered.

PMGT 608 Principles of Project Management (3 credits)
This course is intended as an overview, describing the fundamental principles, processes, knowledge areas, and tools and techniques of project management.  Students will learn how to manage the "faster, better, cheaper" pressures that most organizations face. Topics include the project management life cycle, selecting projects, project planning, quality management, and controlling projects.

PMGT 610 Strategic Management (3 credits)
This course prepares students to assess their organization's strategy, culture, and operations and analyze competitors and the larger industry. Students will learn to use strategic management tools and develop their analytical skills in order to identify opportunities for competitive advantage.  They will also use quantitative tools to measure organizational performance in order to achieve economic and environmental objectives. The course teaches students how companies, institutions, and regulators can incorporate the concept of triple-bottom-line reporting.

PMGT 636 Introduction to Social Entrepreneurship (3 credits)
An exploration of innovative responses to social needs, the role of private initiatives in the private and nonprofit sectors, and the challenges associated with these initiatives in the U.S. and internationally. Theoretical issues such as defining the social good and assessing the role of market forces, philanthropy, and government are reviewed.  Practical issues include developing an organizational mission, recognizing specific opportunities for social improvement, forming an enterprise or working in an organization that responds to those opportunities, and developing organizational and funding strategies. 

 


Preservation & Conservation

This certificate is designed to provide historic preservation skills, perspectives, and competencies for allied professionals. 

Program Details
Credits 12
Timeline 12 months
Next start date August 26, 2019
Post-Master's Certificate Cost $6,000

Course Descriptions

Required Courses

HP 602 Introduction 2: Policy and Practice in American Historic Preservation (3 credits)
Provides a general overview of what historic preservation is and does in the United States, focusing on proper framing of inquiry with appropriate language and protocols into a variety of heritage topics.  Instructor: Lori Price

HP 632 Preservation Planning for Heritage (3 credits)
Develops an understanding of the tools and techniques used by local government to integrate preservation into land use planning, such as long-range planning, commissions, surveys, designations, design review, financial-, zoning-, and process-based incentives. It explores projects and programs that challenge and expand current preservation practice to address the recognition and protection intangible and tangible cultural heritage.  Instructor: Tim Frye

Electives in Historic Preservation

HP 601 Introduction Pt 1: Fundamental Concepts in Heritage Preservation (3 credits)
Provides an overview and history of historic preservation practices in the United States, challenging students to think critically about how practices and policies might evolve to serve additional constituencies in the future. Students explore how the work of preservation serves various American groups, supports the maintenance of a varied built environment with a sense of place, and contributes to the varied agendas of collective memory.  Instructor: Betsy Bradley

HP 635  Preservation Law (3 credits) 
Examines the federal, state, and local laws concerning historic preservation, including tax laws and real estate opportunities (and easements for structures, open areas and historic monuments, locations, and other nationally recognized properties). Additionally reviewed are current developments in historic preservation law litigation, recent decisions in the “takings” area and other constitutional developments relating to landmarking of properties. Instructor: William Cook

HP 623 Preservation Economics (3 credits) 
Exploration of the economics of preservation including the impact of preservation programs and activities on a national, state and local level and the feasibility of individual preservation projects.  Instructor: Kennedy Smith

HP 610 American Architecture and Building (3 credits)
Provides a background in architecture and building in the United States, beginning with the colonial period and proceeding in chronological units to the present.  Students explore the buildings and structures built by the entire cross section of Americans within a context of social, cultural, and political development, with emphasis the foundation of American architectural history as it pertains to the practice of historic preservation.  Instructor: Kimberly Gant

Electives in Cultural Sustainability

CSP 610 Introduction to Cultural Documentation (3 credits) 
Cultural documentation provides an orientation and foundation in the methodologies used to understand and engage with the cultural processes and assets of value to communities. This course introduces best practices in cultural documentation, the use of ethnographic fieldwork and digital media to record and understand culture, and the ethical and practical issues involved in appropriately and effectively engaging with people in a variety of community contexts.  Instructor: TBD

CSP 615 Cultural Partnership (3 credits) 
What are effective strategies for scholars and organizations to work with communities to help develop the capacity for those communities to make choices about what matters to them? This course explores ways that effective enduring partnerships and programs can be developed to reflect the voices and aspirations of communities, their stakeholders, and the cultural organizations that serve them. Instructors: Lisa Rathje and Selena Morales

CSP 630 Community and Economic Development (3 credits) 
A critical feature of cultural sustainability is the development of strategies that align with economic vitality and benefit cultural practitioners. This course surveys, analyzes, and evaluates efforts of this nature: cultural tourism, schools, marketing initiatives for cultural products, and other forms of entrepreneurship.  Instructor: Rebecca Hill

CSP 640 Exhibits, Real and Virtual (3 credits) 
Museum exhibitions, publications, websites, and other media provide powerful tools for sustaining, strengthening, and showcasing the cultural assets and practices of communities for purposes of education, advocacy, and preservation.  Students explore the use of text, image, video, and sound in effectively telling the story of themes and issues that matter to communities. Instructor: Robert Forloney

CSP 635 Interpretive Planning and Project Management (3 credits) 
This class provides insight and guidance into the planning and implementation of cultural programming at museums and similar organizations.  Students will explore best practices and current issues pertaining to the development of interpretive approaches and their concrete implementation in these settings. Instructor: Melissa McLoud

CSP 648 Museums and Communities (3 credits) 
Today's museums are re-considering their civic missions and practices, the ways they engage new partners and audiences, and, therefore, their priorities. Many believe that the health of museums depends on becoming more civically engaged with a range of communities. Successful museums engage in dialogue about civic empowerment and often center on issues of how and where citizens seek and engage each other, about their senses of power, trust, and agency. This cornerstone course encompasses the unique and critical issues of working in today's museums and offers strategies for connecting museums with communities in ways that position them as principal players in cultural sustainability.  Instructor: Melissa McLoud

CSP 660 Oral History (3 credits) 
This course provides training in best practices in oral history documentation. Through hands on instruction and mentorship with oral history practice, students will develop the knowledge and skills to professionally conduct oral history research.  Instructor: Linda Shopes

CSP 650 Organizing Communities: Advocacy, Activism, and Social Justice (3 credits) 
This course introduces students to the methods and perspectives of community organizing. Cultural sustainability is often a matter of social justice and self-determination, and knowledge of community organizing strategies provides a critical tool for Cultural Sustainability practitioners. Organizing, advocacy, and action strategies will be shared and assessed particularly as they pertain to matters of cultural democracy.  Instructor: Sue Eleuterio

CSP 642 Culture and Calamity (3 credits) 
There are physical, psychological, social, and cultural dimensions to upheavals in community life, whether caused by war, economic or environmental devastation, forced displacement, or even policy. Human expression, even in the most authoritarian states and in the direst hours of crisis, cannot be silent. This course will examine the cultural and artistic aspects of upheaval and conflict around the world, including the destruction of traditional culture and emergence of new forms and voices. Case studies and readings will examine culture as a reflection and record of upheaval and as a creative response to it.  Instructor: Michael Shepard; Various

Electives in Management

PMGT 606 Managing an Organization (3 credits) 
This course explores the fundamentals of managing a small or medium-sized organization.  Ethics and social responsibility, legal principles, building and leading a team, business/organizational planning and development, human resource and diversity issues, and international market implications will be covered.

PMGT 608 Principles of Project Management (3 credits) 
This course is intended as an overview, describing the fundamental principles, processes, knowledge areas, and tools and techniques of project management.  Students will learn how to manage the "faster, better, cheaper" pressures that most organizations face. Topics include the project management life cycle, selecting projects, project planning, quality management, and controlling projects.

PMGT 610 Strategic Management (3 credits)
This course prepares students to assess their organization's strategy, culture, and operations and analyze competitors and the larger industry. Students will learn to use strategic management tools and develop their analytical skills in order to identify opportunities for competitive advantage.  They will also use quantitative tools to measure organizational performance in order to achieve economic and environmental objectives. The course teaches students how companies, institutions, and regulators can incorporate the concept of triple-bottom-line reporting.

PMGT 636 Introduction to Social Entrepreneurship (3 credits) 
An exploration of innovative responses to social needs, the role of private initiatives in the private and nonprofit sectors, and the challenges associated with these initiatives in the U.S. and internationally. Theoretical issues such as defining the social good and assessing the role of market forces, philanthropy, and government are reviewed.  Practical issues include developing an organizational mission, recognizing specific opportunities for social improvement, forming an enterprise or working in an organization that responds to those opportunities, and developing organizational and funding strategies.