Anthropology

ANT 107. Cultural Anthropology (3 Cr.) (LER-SSC)
What makes us human? How do people in different societies act and why do they act the way they do? How do we make sense of things such as nation-state, identity, sexism, and poverty? Students in this course, you will acquire ways of thinking about these questions and tools for answering them. In doing so, you will learn how to think like an anthropologist. Fall semester, repeated spring semester.

ANT 203. Anthropological Theory (4 Cr.) 
Identification and analysis of contemporary issues in anthropological theory including such topics as agency, structure, subjectivity, history, social change, power, culture, and the politics of representation. Emergence of these topics in the history of anthropology as a discipline and relationships to broader currents of social, cultural, and philosophical theory. Prerequisites: SOC 106 or ANT 107 or permission of instructor. Fall semester. Schwarz.

ANT 205. African Cultures and Societies (3 Cr.) 
This course invites students to more deeply consider aspects of cultural process and the human condition in Africa through the lens of ethnographic inquiry and attention to African expression. Readings explore infancy and old age, gender, rural and urban settings, agriculture and industry, work and play. Our framework is simultaneously local and global, historical and contemporary, modern and traditional, situating African lives in the complex layering and contexts that shape social experience. Through our engagement with the readings and with documentary films, we will encounter and address such theoretical themes and issues as agency, colonialism, nationalism, performance, enculturation, political economy, cultural change, and the ethics and practices of ethnographic representation. This course will prepare students to move beyond superficial understanding of African lives, and provide inspiration and possible focus for study abroad or other further research. Prerequisite: SOC 106 or ANT 107 or permission of instructor. Spring semester. Offered 2016-17 and alternate years. Turner.  

ANT 208. Culture and the Human Body (3 Cr.) 
We all have a body, yet the ways that we use and experience our bodies vary greatly across societies, social classes, ethnic groups and genders. Clearly, the body is not just natural but also cultural. How does culture influence our understandings of the body and its processes? How does it influence the way we live in our bodies?  Students who choose to take this course will answer these questions by examining the role of "the body" in the mind/body divide, industrial capitalism, medicine & healing, reproduction, and technology. Prerequisite: SOC 106 or ANT 107 or permission of instructor.  Spring semester. Offered 2016-17 and alternate years. Schwarz.  

ANT 210. Anthropology of Health, Healing, and Illness (3 Cr.) 
This course looks at cultural dimensions of health, healing and illness. How is health understood in different cultures? How are people healed? What cultural factors are involved in the experience and diagnosis of illness, and how does structural violence and social suffering contribute to illness? Material will be explored from a broad range of cultural settings.  Prerequisite: SOC 106 or ANT 107 or permission of instructor. Fall semester. Offered 2015-16 and alternate years. Turner.  

ANT 234. Religion, Myth, and Symbol (3 Cr.) (LER-DIV)
This course provides an introduction to the diversity of spiritual belief, experience, and practice manifest in the world's cultures. Understanding and analyzing this diversity has been an important project for anthropologists since the inception of the discipline. In this course we will embark on a double journey, first through the world's religious traditions, and second, through the approaches of anthropologists and other social theorists to the challenge of understanding the forms, functions, and meanings of religious phenomena in human social life. Prerequisite: SOC 106 or ANT 107 or permission of instructor. Spring semester. Offered 2015-16 and alternate years. Turner.

ANT 238. Cultures of Contemporary Europe (4 Cr.) (LER - DIV)(LER - SSC)
Overview of major themes and current fieldwork of Europeanist cultural anthropology. Themes include: immigration and nationhood; political ritual and collective memory; family and kinship; religion and politics; gender; and social class. Includes survey of post-1945 era (economic recovery, decolonization, the collapse of Communism, European unification). Prerequisite: SOC 106, ANT 107, one history course (HIS 217 recommended), or permission of instructor. May be taken with FR 295 (1 credit). Fall semester. Offered 2016-17 and alternate years. Ingram.

ANT 243. The Craft of Anthropology I (4 Cr.) 
This course lays the foundation for students to identify and develop ethnographic and theoretical inquiry into topics of anthropological interest and concern. Ethnographic, academic, and archival research methods, the development and critique of research plans, and reflexive consideration of the means and ends of anthropological practice will be introduced and explored. Students will be prepared to, and will begin to engage, in sustained in-depth research projects. Prerequisite: SOC 106 or ANT 107 or permission of instructor. Fall semester. Turner.

ANT 244. The Craft of Anthropology II (4 Cr.) 
This course builds on student work begun in ANT 243. Connected through the creation of a global collaborative community of learning and practice, students undertake sustained ethnographic work in a setting of their choice. Students are supported and critiqued in their fieldwork and theoretical development. The outcome of this course is a polished ethnographic essay. Prerequisite: ANT 243. Spring semester. Turner.

ANT 255. Political Anthropology (4 Cr.) 
Political orders and processes vary tremendously across cultures. How do different societies address such issues as legitimacy, order, justice, violence, hierarchy and power through political ideas and actions? How do societies respond to political domination and change? How is culture political and the political culture? Consideration will be given to traditional forms of political organization and to the relationship of peoples to the state and other dominating institutions. Prerequisite: SOC 106 or ANT 107 or permission of instructor. Spring semester. Offered 2016-2017 and alternate years. Turner.

ANT 260. Your Semester Abroad: History, Ethics, and Planning (1 Cr.) 
This class will prepare students for their semester-long study abroad experience, from both theoretical and practical perspectives. Students will learn about the history and ethics of study abroad, in preparation for moving beyond being mere tourists to engaging with their hosts. Topics will include theoretical frameworks such as identity, culture/culture shock, and neocolonialism as well as practical issues such as safety, health, and religious considerations. All students will take responsibility for their own study abroad experience, researching the country and region that will host them, as well as setting personal learning objectives. The course will feature several guest speakers. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and student must be enrolled in long-term study abroad program in following term, or Permission of Instructor. Fall and Spring semesters.

ANT 262. Studies in Self-determination in Native America (4 Cr.) 
This course provides a critical overview of Native American self-determination. Drawing on examples from prehistory, the era of conquest and US expansion, and modern-day battles over natural resources, this course will encourage students to examine concepts such as identity, colonization and sovereignty through an inter-disciplinary perspective. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Spring semester every other year. Bess.

ANT 275. Language Myths (3 Cr.) (LER-DIV)
Every day we hear people evaluating other people's speech: "Can you believe it? She said 'ain't'!" "I know he's a smart guy, but he just sounds so ignorant!" Underlying such statements are myths about language and the way it works. This course aims to explore language myths on three levels. First of all, students will learn to challenge their own linguistic beliefs. Secondly, they will understand the role of linguistic misconceptions in the perpetuation of social inequality. Finally, the course serves as a general introduction to linguistic anthropology. Prerequisites: SOC 106 or ANT 107 or permission of instructor. Spring semester. Offered 2015-16 and alternate years. Schwarz.

ANT 280. Special Topics in Anthropology (3-4 Cr.) 
Critical analysis of substantive issues in the field of anthropology. Topics are determined by interests of the instructor and students and are announced one semester in advance. May be repeated if topic is different. Prerequisite: ANT 107 or SOC 106 or permission of the instructor. Variable semesters.

ANT 290. Internship in Anthropology (3-4 Cr.) 
Faculty-directed, off-campus experience in administration, research, and service with private institutions, community organizations, agencies or government, and (occasionally) independent professionals. Graded pass/no pass. Prerequisites: SOC 106 or ANT 107, and one 200-level course in anthropology. Preliminary application and interview required.

ANT 299. Independent Work (1-4 Cr.) 
An independent research project and presentation of findings or a special program of directed readings. Students arrange individually with any member of the program. Prerequisite: SOC 106 or ANT 107 or permission of instructor.

ANT 392. Seminar: Selected Problems in Anthropology (4 Cr.) 
Topics selected according to current debates in the field and interests of instructor and students. Subject announced one semester in advance. Topics include ethnographic research methods. May be repeated if topic is different. Prerequisites: Junior standing and one of the following courses: SOC 203, SOC 210, SOC 217, ANT 203 or ANT 243. Variable semesters. Department.

ANT 410. Senior Capstone in Sociology and Anthropology (4 Cr.) 
The capstone is an intensive culminating experience for majors. Students work to integrate their previous coursework and understanding of disciplinary perspectives into a culminating piece of scholarship. Prerequisites: Senior standing and one 300-level seminar in Sociology or Anthropology. Spring semester.


Sociology

SOC 100. Law and Society (3 Cr.) 
An introductory, interdisciplinary examination of law as a social institution. Focus is on the origin, history, and philosophy of legal systems from an international perspective, as well as the relationship in the United States between common law and statutory law, federal and state law, the courts and legislative bodies, and the courts and the executive branch of government. Exploration of the legal profession, its history, practice, goals, and place in American society. Prerequisite: SOC 106 or ANT 107. Spring semester. Department.

SOC 106. The Sociological Imagination (3 Cr.) (LER-SSC)
The sociological perspective focuses on the link between individual experience, the current social context, and the past. Exploration of this link and examination of cultural variations in social interaction and the development of self, the formation of families and communities, the processes that produce conformity or deviance, and the conditions that lead to conflict and social change through selected readings, case studies, novels, and films. Tracing of changes in work, marital relationships, religious practices, and political participation. Uses theories and methods of sociology to explore the influence of race, class, gender, ethnicity, and age on the human experience. Fall semester, repeated spring semester.

SOC 202. Identity (3 Cr.) 
Examination of theories of the self and identity beginning with the early symbolic interactionist tradition and moving into contemporary perspectives. Topics include: names and naming, the importance of others and social interaction, as well as identity entrances, exits, transformations, and commutes. The course will place a strong emphasis on narrative analysis and the subjective and intersubjective experience of a variety of identities, both "exotic" and mundane. Prerequisites: SOC 106 or ANT 107 or permission of instructor. Spring semester. Offered 2015-16 and alternate years. Mullaney.  

SOC 203. Qualitative Inquiry (4 Cr.) 
This course provides a foundation in the use of qualitative methods of inquiry, including in-depth interviewing, focus groups, participant observation, and narrative research. Course readings allow students to explore the link between theory and methods, as well as examine ethical issues in research.  Students develop projects that allow them to demonstrate research design, coding, and analysis using a qualitative data analysis program. Required for all majors. Prerequisite: SOC 106 or ANT 107 or permission of instructor. Fall semester. Mullaney, Shope.  

SOC 210. Development of Sociological Thought (4 Cr.) 
This course introduces students to a wide range of classical and contemporary sociological theories, beginning with the study of theory in the historical context of its development. Examines the work of Marx, Weber, Simmel, Durkheim, Mead, and DuBois. Applies classical and contemporary social theory to current issues. Explores recent modifications to mainstream sociological theory, including critical theory and feminist critiques of the classical theorists' work. Required of all program majors. Prerequisite: SOC 106 or ANT 107 or permission of the instructor. Fall semester. Mullaney.

SOC 212. New Religious Movements (3 Cr.) 
This course begins with the social scientific study of new religious movements and cults: How do we define these terms? Why do these movements develop and why do people join them? We will then study a variety of such movements, focusing particularly on apocalyptic movements, claims to supernatural powers and revelations, offshoots and combinations of pre-existent religions, nature religions and new age religious groups. Spring 2016 and alternate years thereafter. Duncan.

SOC 213. Sociology of Education (4 Cr.) 
 This course considers education as a social institution, broadly and comparatively. Topics addressed vary by year, but often include the functions of education; links between education and inequality by class and race; cross-cultural variation in primary, secondary, and tertiary education systems; the role of colleges and universities in the United States; and challenges to "mainstream" educational models such as home-schooling movements and critical pedagogies. This class may include a service-learning component. Prerequisite: SOC 106 or ANT 107 or permission of the instructor. Fall semester. Offered 2014-15 and alternate years. Ghoshal.  

SOC 216. Development and Social Change in Costa Rica (4 Cr.) 
This course examines the particular development path and processes of social change in Costa Rica with an emphasis on the post-World War II paradigm that gave rise to the social-democratic structure of Costa Rican society. Drawing on the body of literature from Latin-American theorists, students will explore notions of exceptionalism, myth-making and myth-breaking, conservation and the Green Republic, and the rise of ecotourism in Costa Rica. Prerequisite: 100-level course in a social science. Spring semester.

SOC 217. Methods of Social Research (4 Cr.) 
Concepts and methods of quantitative social science research. Research methods, research design, and statistical analysis of data. Ethics in social research. Training in the selection of appropriate research designs for a variety of sociological problems. Major data sources and methods of data collection. Use of statistics in analyzing and presenting data. Exercises in design, data collection, and statistical analysis. Required of all program majors. Open to other students by permission of the instructor. Prerequisites: SOC 106 and one 200-level course in sociology or anthropology. Offered Fall and Spring 2015-16 then spring semesters. Shope.

SOC 220. Comparative Race and Ethnic Relations (4 Cr.) (LER-DIV)
This course considers race and ethnicity from a comparative perspective, with principal emphasis on past and present construction of race in the United States. It addresses the origins, processes, and consequences of racialization - that is, the use of the idea of race to differentiate groups of people. The course considers prejudice and discrimination, connections between race and class, institutional and unconscious racism, and transformations in national and global systems of race in the past several decades. Service-learning and/or experiential learning components may be included; the nature of these components will vary by year. Prerequisite: SOC 106 or ANT 107 or permission of the instructor. Spring semester. Offered 2016-17 and alternate years. Ghoshal.

SOC 245. Wealth, Power, and Prestige (3 Cr.) 
Exploration of the origins, nature, and functions of social inequality, focusing on the processes that produce and maintain inequalities in wealth, power, privilege, and prestige in modern societies. Comparative analysis of objective and subjective consequences of class and caste stratification systems. Relative impact of class, race, gender, or ethnic differences on life opportunities. Prerequisite: SOC 106 or ANT 107 or permission of the instructor. Fall semester. Offered 2015-2016 and alternate years. Ghoshal.

SOC 250. Criminal Justice (3 Cr.) 
Examines the criminal justice system and provides an overview of basic issues in the sociological study of crime and corrections. Relying on the premise that law, crime, and the institutions of social control can be understood only as part of the larger social context, explores crime in the streets, the business world, and the family. Theories on the origin of crime, the causes of criminal behavior, and the evolution of criminal law provide the framework for discussion of special topics that include the demography of crime, women in the criminal justice system, domestic violence and the law, and the criminology of drunken drivers. Course assignments include a visit to a prison and/or a ride with a police officer. Prerequisite: SOC 106 or ANT 107 or permission of the instructor. Spring semester. Offered 2016-17 and alternate years. Mullaney.

SOC 260. Deviance and Social Control (3 Cr.) 
Exploration of particular kinds of rule-violating behavior such as insanity, crime, and sexual deviance; stigmatization and labeling; the creation and maintenance of deviant identities; consequences of social control of deviants for individual liberties and for society. Prerequisite: SOC 106 or ANT 107 or permission of the instructor. Fall semester. Offered 2015-2016 and alternate years. Mullaney.

SOC 265. Health and Illness (3 Cr.) 
Examination of illness, health, and the organization of medical care from a sociological perspective, focusing on the medical system as a social institution and the history of public health and medicine. Specific topics include the reciprocal roles of patient, practitioner, and ancillary health care personnel and the social and cultural factors affecting etiology, diagnosis, and treatment. Prerequisites: SOC 106 or ANT 107. Fall semester. Offered 2016-17 and alternate years. Shope.

SOC 270. Gender, Work, and Family (3 Cr.) 
Examination of gender expectations and experiences in work and family. Review of theories explaining effects of gender on employment and family life. Issues discussed include occupational segregation, pay inequities, household division of labor, intimate partner violence, and alternate family forms.   Prerequisite: SOC 106, ANT 107, WS 100, or WS 150. Fall semester. Offered 2015-16 and alternate years. Shope.

SOC 271. Protest! Legacy of the Sixties (4 Cr.) 
An examination of social movements, with emphasis on movements of the 1960s and today in the United States. Specific movements addressed will vary by year, but often include struggles for civil rights, the women's liberation movement, anti-war protests, and environmental movements. These subjects form the backdrop for consideration of recent protest activity. This course may include a service-learning component. Prerequisite: SOC 106 or ANT 107 or permission of the instructor. Spring semester. Offered 2015-2016 and alternate years. Ghoshal.

SOC 272Y. Intensive Course Abroad (variable) 
May be repeated if topic is different. CIVIL SOCIETY AND SOCIAL CHANGE (5) (PSC 272Y) A detailed introduction to South African social and political history, culture and contemporary society, followed by a three-week intensive experience in South Africa (2 credits) The semester course is followed by a three-week intensive experience in south Africa (3 credits). Shope, Singer. ARTS, CULTURE AND MUSIC IN BALI (4) This interdisciplinary course invites students to experience Bali through intensive immersion in its music, dance, and visual arts, and exploration of its culture and history. In this intensive course abroad, students will have opportunities to document their experiences and share their reflections on Bali, grappling with such questions as the everyday nuances of cultural difference, the impact of the creative economy and tourism on Balinese culture, the transformative power of Balinese performance and art, and their own role as global consumers and citizens. We will explore Bali's rich history, performing and visual arts, traditions and heritage through workshops, lectures, performances, and site visits led by Balinese scholars and artists. Students will come away from this course with a deep, informed, and experiential appreciation of Bali's unique artistic gifts, the ability to document, describe and critically reflect on Balinese cultural performances, and an understanding of the unique Balinese response to challenges of cultural sustainability in our global era. The 1 credit pre-departure course focuses on ethnographic practices of participant-observation, reflexivity, and cultural documentation and introduces key readings and concepts in the study of Balinese culture and society. Turner. COSTA RICA: DEVELOPMENT, CONSERVATION, ECOTOURISM, AND SPANISH (3) Costa Rica is a leading tourist destination as a result of its commitment to peace and protection of its environment. Of its energy production, over 90% is from renewable resources. It considers the social services of education and health to be a right of its citizens. This course will examine the current state of Costa Rica's political, economic, and social development within the past 50 years, with special emphasis on the issues surrounding demilitarization, conservation, education, health and rural development. Students will explore the relationship between natural resources, ecotourism and sustainable development in Costa Rica-a tropical, demilitarized country between two oceans and two continents. Mullaney.

SOC 280. Current Themes in Sociology (3-4 Cr.) 
Critical analysis of substantive issues in the field of sociology. Topics are determined by interests of the instructor and students and are announced one semester in advance. May be repeated for credit if the topic is different. Prerequisites: SOC 106 or ANT 107 or permission of the instructor. Fall or spring semester.

SOC 282. Topics in Health and Medicine (3-4 Cr.) 
Critical analysis of substantive issues in the field of health and medicine. Topics are determined by interests of the instructor and students and are announced one semester in advance. May be repeated for credit if the topic is different. Prerequisites: SOC 106 or ANT 107 or permission of the instructor. Spring semester 2016 then alternate falls starting 2017-18. Shope.  

SOC 283. Topics in Social Science (4 Cr.) 
Targeting social science majors, this course will be team-taught by Monteverde Institute's (MVI) and visiting faculty, with topics reflecting the expertise of visiting faculty and MVI's thematic foci of water, ecotourism, land use planning and development, community health, and tropical ecology and biodiversity. In addition, students will learn social science research methodologies applicable to their research projects. Prerequisites: One 200-level course in social sciences. Methods course encouraged. Spring semester.

SOC 290. Internship in Sociology (3-4 Cr.) 
Faculty-directed, off-campus experience in administration, research, and service with private institutions, community organizations, agencies, or government, and (occasionally) independent professionals. Graded pass/no pass. Prerequisite: SOC 106 and one 200-level course in sociology. Preliminary application and interview required.

SOC 299. Independent Work (1-4 Cr.) 
An independent research project and presentation of findings or a special program of directed readings. Students arrange individually with any member of the program. Prerequisite: SOC 106 or ANT 107 or permission of the instructor.

SOC 310. Collective Memory (4 Cr.) 
Our memories are not merely individual; rather, they are shaped by the societies in which we live. Dramatic experiences such as the American Revolution, slavery and emancipation, the Holocaust, and the attacks of 9/11 are important memories to many people who never directly experienced them. This course considers two dimensions of collective memory: first, the link between social influence and individuals' memories and identities; and second, "enacted" collective memory in the form of holidays, rituals, museums, monuments and statues, and the like. In addition to reading and writing extensively about collective memory, the class also features several experiential components that draw on cultural and historic resources unique to the Baltimore area. Prerequisites: Junior standing and one of the following courses: SOC 203, SOC 210, SOC 217, ANT 203 or ANT 243. Variable semesters. Ghoshal.  

SOC 381. Seminar: Common Sense(s) (4 Cr.) 
This seminar in cognitive sociology examines how the social influences our senses or the ways we take in the world around us. Special attention will be given to the processes of perception, classification and boundary creation, time reckoning, identity formation, and collective memory. Course materials will draw from the fields of sociology, psychology, economics, literature, and other related areas. Prerequisites: Junior standing and one of the following courses: SOC 203, SOC 210, SOC 217, ANT 203 or ANT 243. Fall semester. Offered 2015-2016 and alternate years. Mullaney.

SOC 384. Seminar: Sociology of Masculinities (4 Cr.) 
This course examines men's lives and the construction of multiple masculinities in contemporary American culture. Special attention will be given to men's movements, media representations, sex, friendship, violence, and sports. Prerequisites: Junior standing and one of the following courses: SOC 203, SOC 210, SOC 217, ANT 203 or ANT 243. Spring semester. Offered 2016-17 and alternate years. Mullaney.

SOC 389. Seminar: Sociology of Mental Health (4 Cr.) 
This course examines the way people define mental health, the causes and consequences of mental health problems, and how institutions respond to mental illness. Specific issues explored include the social construction of mental disorder, depression, medicalization of life problems, and the social consequences of mental health problems. Prerequisites: Junior standing and one of the following courses: SOC 203, SOC 210, SOC 217, ANT 203 or ANT 243. Spring semester. Offered 2015-16 and alternate years. Shope.

SOC 392. Seminar: Domestic Violence (4 Cr.) 
This course systematically examines the social character and causes of domestic violence, with special attention given to intimate partner violence, child abuse, and courtship violence. Students explore the social, historical, and political processes that influence domestic violence. Includes a required service-learning component. Prerequisites: Junior standing and one of the following courses: SOC 203, SOC 210, SOC 217, ANT 203 or ANT 243. Spring semester. Offered 2018-19 and alternate years. Shope.

SOC 393. Seminar: Sociological Analysis of Selected Topics (4 Cr.) 
A critical examination of theoretical and methodological contributions of classic and contemporary work in the field. Topics selected according to current debates in the field. Topics include domestic violence, poverty and social welfare, and issues in mental health. May be repeated for credit if the topic is different. Prerequisites: Junior standing and one of the following courses: SOC 203, SOC 210, SOC 217, ANT 203 or ANT 243. Fall or spring semester.

SOC 410. Senior Capstone in Sociology and Anthropology (4 Cr.) 
The capstone is an intensive culminating experience for majors. Students work to integrate their previous coursework and understanding of disciplinary perspectives into a major piece of scholarship. Prerequisites: Senior standing and one 300-level seminar in Sociology or Anthropology. Spring semester.