Required Courses

MA 170. CALCULUS I (FORMERLY MA 117) (4) (GEN. ED. #5) (LER-MR)
The concepts of limit and derivative are developed, along with their applications to the natural and social sciences. A symbolic algebra system is used as both an investigative and computational tool. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory. Prerequisite: placement exam or MA 160 with a minimum grade of C-. Prerequisite to MA 180. Credit will not be given for those who have received credit for MA 171.
Fall semester, repeated spring semester. Department.

MA 180. CALCULUS II (FORMERLY MA 118) (4) (GEN. ED. #5) (LER-MR)
The concepts of Riemann sums and definite and indefinite integrals are developed, along with their applications to the natural and social sciences. A symbolic algebra system is used as both an investigative and computational tool. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory. Prerequisite: placement exam or MA 170 or 171 with a minimum grade of C-. Prerequisite to MA 216, 221, 222, and 240.
Fall semester, repeated spring semester. Department.

MA 221. LINEAR ALGEBRA (4) (GEN. ED. #5)
Vector spaces, linear equations and matrices, linear transformations, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors.
Four hours lecture. Prerequisite: MA 180 with a minimum grade of C-.
Spring semester. Tutinas.

MA 222. CALCULUS III (4) (GEN. ED. #5)
Three-dimensional analytic geometry, infinite series, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and vector calculus. Four hours lecture. Prerequisite: MA 180 with a minimum grade of C-.
Fall semester. McKibben.

MA 231. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS WITH APPLICATIONS (3)
Introduction to the theory of linear and nonlinear systems of ordinary differential equations.
Equal emphasis on analytic, qualitative, and numeric methods. Applications to biological sciences, chemistry, ecology, economics, physics, and other sciences, including some work in mathematical modeling. Three hours lecture. Corequisite: MA 221 and 222.
Spring semester. Offered 2011-12 and alternate years. Koch, McKibben and Webster.

CS 116. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE (4) (GEN. ED. #5)
Introduction to the discipline of computer science and its unifying concepts through a study of the principles of program specification and design, algorithm development, object-oriented program coding and testing, and visual interface development. Prerequisite: placement exam or CS 105 with a minimum grade of C-.
Fall semester. Zimmerman.

PHY 125. GENERAL PHYSICS I (4) (GEN. ED. #6) (LER-NS)
A calculus-based course where lecture and laboratory are combined and taught using an interactive teaching method employing computers and guided inquiry through hands-on experiments. The method is designed to increase problem-solving and analytical-thinking skills and to guide students toward a coherent and logical approach to understanding the world. Topics include kinematics and dynamics of linear and angular motions, universal gravitation, conservation of energy and momentum, simple harmonic motion, and fluids. Six hours integrated lecture/laboratory. Pre- or corequisite: MA 170 or permission of the instructor.
Fall semester. Dukan.

PHY 126. GENERAL PHYSICS II (4) (GEN. ED. #6)
A continuation of PHY 125. Topics include wave motion, electricity and magnetism, and physical and geometrical optics. Six hours integrated lecture/laboratory. Prerequisite: PHY 125. Pre- or corequisite: MA 180 or permission of the instructor.
Spring semester. Dukan.

CHE 111. PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY I (3) (GEN. ED. #6 WITH CHE 112 OR 112H) (LER-NS WITH CHE 112)
Structure and properties of atoms and molecules and the states of matter, relationship of electronic structure to the properties of elements and simple compounds, properties of solutions, acid-base and redox reactions in solution. Prerequisite: A score of M on the mathematics placement exam. Corequisite: CHE 112 (or 112H). Three hours lecture and 90-minute workshop.
Fall semester. Gibbs.

CHE 112. PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY I: LABORATORY (1) (GEN. ED. #6 WITH CHE 111) (LER-NS WITH CHE 111)
Experiments that illustrate topics covered in CHE 111. Corequisite: CHE 111. Three hours lab.
Fall semester. Douglass, Sibley.

CHE 151. PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY II: LECTURE (3)
The theory of chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, aspects of solution equilibria, including solubility, acid-base reactions, redox reactions, and complex formation. The application of these theories to gravimetric and volumetric analysis. Prerequisites: CHE 111 and 112 (or 112H) or permission of the instructor. Corequisite: CHE 152 (or 152H). Three hours lecture and 90-minute workshop.
Spring semester. Gibbs.

CHE 152. PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY II: LABORATORY (1)
A laboratory experience demonstrating the principles and applications of the theories discussed in CHE 151. Three hours laboratory Prerequisites: CHE 111 and 112 (or 112H). Corequisite: CHE 151.
Spring semester. Douglass, Sibley