Home >  Academics >  Psychology >  Psychology News > News Story

Eastern Psychological Association 2007

Release date: May 14, 2007

They presented five posters on Friday March 23rd as well as attended various other presentations and poster sessions throughout the day.

The first poster was entitled “Development of the McKim and Martinkowski Lack of Organization Scale (MMLOS)” by Professors Ann McKim, Karen Martinkowski, and student Molly Abend. Other students who helped with data collection for this topic included Elyse Kotzker and Danielle Marks. This poster focused on how a student’s environment can be influenced by positive psychology and feng shui.

In the cognitive poster session, Goucher presented three posters. The first poster in this session was “A Synesthete’s Solution: Wrong Color + Wrong Color = Slower Times” by students Catherine Foster, Stephanie Ricketts, Shari Metzger, and Professor Carol Mills.

 

The second poster was entitled the “Faster Processing for Synesthetic Colors in Speeded Classification of Simple Arithmetic Equations” by students Mallory Clark, Meridith Hurd and Professor Thomas Ghirardelli. Both of these posters compared the speed and accuracy in solving simple addition equations of a synesthete versus non-synesthetes. However, the two research groups used different tasks. 

   

The final poster in the cognitive session was titled “The Effects of Practice on the Attentional Blink.” This poster was authored by students Molly Abend, Mallory Clark, Meridith Hurd, K. Megan Davis, Alexandra Orme, David Price and Professor Thomas Ghirardelli. The attentional blink is a task that shows when paying attention to one thing may mean that you miss something else when processing information. There is evidence that this deficit is reduced, but not eliminated with practice.

Finally, to conclude the evening Professors Karen Martinkowski, Carol Mills, and student Shari Metzger presented the poster “Neuropsychological Evaluation of a Color-Digit Synesthete.” In this poster, both the cognitive strengths and weaknesses of a synesthete were described.  

 

All of the posters attracted interest and attention from other attendees, and the students were very proud to share the results of their research. The students were very grateful to a generous donor for providing them with comfortable lodging and a fabulous dinner during their stay in Philadelphia.   

Two graduates from the Goucher class of 2006 Ann Mae Stellwag and Jayme Oltarzewski who are continuing their psychology studies in graduate school in Philadelphia, also attended the conference.