PSY 111. Introduction to Psychology (3 Cr.) (LER-NS WITH PSY 112)
An overview of the contemporary field of psychology. Topics include fundamental issues in psychology, physiological psychology, perception, principles of learning and cognition, theories of personality, and clinical, humanistic, developmental, and social psychologies. Emphasis on philosophical and methodological foundations of a scientific study of mind and behavior. Students intending to become psychology majors should register concurrently for PSY 112. Fall semester, repeated spring semester. Choe, Ghirardelli, Wilterdink.

PSY 112. Introduction to Psychology: Laboratory (1 Cr.) (LER-NS WITH PSY 111)
Experiments and laboratory demonstrations illustrating topics covered in PSY 111. Intended either to be taken concurrently with PSY 111 or for students who have previously taken an introductory psychology course equivalent to PSY 111. Fall semester, repeated spring semester. LoPresto.

PSY 200. Statistical Methods in Psychology (4 Cr.) (LER-MR)
An introduction to and critical examination of statistical and quantitative methods as applied in psychology and related fields. Exploratory, descriptive, and inferential concepts, techniques, and applications are considered including frequency distributions, measures of central tendency, variability and correlation, parameter estimation, and hypothesis testing (binomial tests, t-tests, analyses of variance, chi square, and selected non-parametric approaches). Statistical packages such as SPSS for Windows will be introduced and used throughout the course. Prerequisites: PSY 111, or ED 101, or ED 103; one additional 200-level psychology course or ED 207; or permission of the instructor. PSY 112 is a prerequisite or co-requisite. Fall semester, repeated spring semester. Ghirardelli.

PSY 202. Human Learning and Memory (4 Cr.) 
This class explores fundamental concepts and current issues in human learning and memory, with a focus on how and why behavior changes with experience, and how this information is stored in the mind. In addition to classic research and theories, there is emphasis on real-world applications, such as in the domains of education, mental health, and the legal system Prerequisite: PSY 111. Fall semester. McCabe.

PSY 207. Psychological and Developmental Foundations of Education (3 -4 Cr.) 
The nature and theories of learning and development. Topics include cognitive development; the development of concepts of time, space, and numbers; classification and causality; reinforcement; transfer of training; memory and forgetting; common patterns of learning difficulties; and principles of teaching and learning. Students electing course for four credit hours must reserve Tuesday or Thursday from 8:30 a.m. to noon to complete a 30-hour internship. All students preparing for secondary education certification must elect the internship option for four credits. Prerequisite: ED 101 or ED 103, and SPE 100 or permission of instructor. Spring semester. Smith.

PSY 212. Existential and Humanistic Psychology (4 Cr.) 
Major theories of existential and humanistic psychology are covered, including consideration of the work of May, Laing, Frankl, Fromm, Rogers, and Maslow. Themes of human freedom, love, peak experiences, and optimal development will be emphasized. Prerequisite: PSY 111. Fall semester. Patrick.

PSY 219. Black Psychology (4 Cr.) (LER-DIV)
Cultural psychology is a subfield within the areas of social psychology and cultural anthropology. It involves the study of the interconnections between and among intergenerationally transmitted behaviors, meanings, and symbols, and psychological processes such as cognition, affect, personality structure, and behavior. This course offers a foundation to the field through a case study of Black culture and psychology. Specifically, we will examine the cultural psychological experiences of people of African descent, primarily African Americans, and Black Psychology as a specialty with important implications for human and social science conceptual paradigms, theory, knowledge production methods, and intervention.  Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Spring semester. Grayman-Simpson.

PSY 220. Personality Theory (4 Cr.) 
Examination and appraisal of several theorists and theories from among the following: Freud, Horney, Jung, and others. Prerequisite: PSY 111. Fall semester, repeated spring semester. McKim.

PSY 226. Relational Psychology (4 Cr.) 
Moving away from a framework of psychological research, theory, and evaluation that unduly values objectivity, independence, and personal achievement, students explore collaboratively the ramifications of a psychology that places human relationship, connection, community, and care at the center of psychological health and development, where mutual empowerment and empathy, rather than separation from others, are the goals. This feminist, antiracist, and critical psychology recognizes the powerful impact of the sociocultural context in impeding mutuality, and provides an interpretive framework for understanding and reshaping culture, lives, and theory. Specific topics vary from year to year, but include the following: the works of Carol Gilligan, the relational psychology of Jean Baker Miller and the Stone Center, the psychology of gender (e.g., girls' development, the construction of masculinity), the psychology of oppression, and relational classrooms and environments. Prerequisite: PSY 111 or sophomore standing. Fall semester. Pringle.

PSY 227. Psychology of Women (4 Cr.) 
Examination of sociocultural and biological influences on the psychological development of women. Topics will include feminist scholarship and research; gender role socialization; women's health and well-being; sexuality; and close relationships and family dynamics. Prerequisite: PSY 111. Spring semester. Grayman-Simpson.

PSY 228. Positive Psychology (4 Cr.) 
This course is an introduction to the major principles, theories, research, and limitations of positive psychology. Positive psychology investigates human strengths and positive emotions that promote the enhancement of life on an individual and group level. Major topics include flow, optimism, stress and coping, social support, spiritual support, feng shui, self-help, and prosocial behavior. There is an international perspective provided throughout the course. Prerequisite: PSY 111. Fall semester. McKim.

PSY 230. Social Psychology (4 Cr.) 
Study of how the thoughts, behaviors, emotions, and motivations of individuals dynamically interact with the social context that surrounds them. Topics include close relationships, aggression, conformity and obedience, social cognition, group dynamics, stereotypes and prejudice, and the impact of gender roles and cultural ideology on the development of the social self. Prerequisite: PSY 111. Spring semester. Patrick.

PSY 233. Sensation and Perception (4 Cr.) 
This course is a survey of current theory and research in perception. The primary goal is for students to gain an understanding of how people obtain reliable and useful information about the environment around them through their senses. Exploring several perceptual systems, including vision, audition, touch and pain, and smell and taste, we will cover topics such as the physiological structure of sensory systems, psychophysics, attention, sensory integration, and comparative perception. Prerequisite: PSY 111. Fall semester. Ghirardelli.

PSY 235. Cognitive Psychology (4 Cr.) 
The science of Cognitive Psychology involves exploring how the human mind processes information. This includes studying how and why the human mind evolved, how it develops through the lifespan, how it accomplishes the extraordinary achievements necessary for day-to-day living, and what happens when something goes wrong. Major topics include: perception, attention, memory, imagery, language, problem solving, and decision-making. Prerequisites: PSY 111 or COG 110   . Spring semester. McCabe.

PSY 237. Physiological Psychology (4 Cr.) 
Investigates physiological and neurological basis of behavior; considers receptor, central, and effector structures; the organization of behavior as it relates to action of the nervous system. Focus is placed on biological contributions to mental and neurological disorders. Prerequisite: PSY 111. Spring semester. Department.

PSY 239. Health Psychology (4 Cr.) 
An introduction to the ways in which the mind, body, and behavior interact in health and disease. Topics include health behaviors and behavior change, coping with illness/disability, self-management approaches to physical illness, the impact of stress and coping on disease and on immune function, and the relationship between psychopathology and physical health. Treatment and prevention efforts will be considered. Prerequisite: PSY 111. Spring semester. Offered in 2014 and alternate years. Friedman-Wheeler.

PSY 244. Lifespan Developmental Psychology (4 Cr.) 
A lifespan approach tracing human development from conception through the life cycle until death. Important theoretical contributors are highlighted, including Freud, Erikson, Bowlby, Piaget, Chomsky, Kohlberg, and Kubler-Ross. Topics will include prenatal development, language acquisition, the formation of emotional bonds in relationships, personality and identity development, changes in family and work roles, and the experience of facing one’s mortality. Prerequisite: PSY 111. Spring semester. Choe.

PSY 245. Psychology of Environmental Problems (4 Cr.) (LER ENV)
This course outlines current environmental problems and their historical bases. The course then explores how different psychological perspectives view the relationship between individuals and the environment, as well as reviews psychological research related to environmental sustainability. Guidance is provided for improving environmental sustainability based on the different psychological perspectives. A major goal of this course is for students to develop an understanding of how psychology can contribute to promoting sustainability of the environment. A community-based learning experience is required. Prerequisite: ES 140 or PSY 111. Fall semester. Mills.

PSY 252. Quantitative Research Methods in Psychology (4 Cr.) 
This course will address the overall process of psychological research from the development of a research question to the presentation of research results. Topics to be covered include the role of theory in the scientific method, research design, various collection techniques and analytic strategies for quantitative empirical data, and ethical considerations. Students will develop skills in scientific writing (APA style) and critically reading and reviewing the literature. The course will require statistical analysis of research data and interpretation of the results. Prerequisites: PSY 111 and PSY 200. Fall semester, repeated spring semester. Friedman-Wheeler and Choe.

PSY 255. Qualitative Research Methods in Psychology (4 Cr.) 
An introduction to qualitative empirical methods and their application to selected problems of psychology, providing an introduction to issues of qualitative research design, analysis, and report writing. Central topics include narrative approaches, biography, phenomenology, ethnography, grounded theory, and case study. These topics are introduced and developed in the context of student-generated, collaborative research projects of significance to researchers and participants and will involve field observations, open interviews, emergent design, and a variety of approaches to data analysis and interpretation. Ethical considerations are emphasized throughout. Prerequisites: PSY 111 and PSY 200. Fall semester, repeated spring semester. Pringle and Grayman-Simpson.

PSY 271. Psychological Distress and Disorder (4 Cr.) 
This course presents different approaches to understanding and conceptualizing psychological distress and disorder. The major psychological disorders will be examined in cultural context. Different theoretical perspectives will be considered, as well as the ways in which psychological disorders have been and are currently treated. Prerequisite: PSY 111. Fall semester, repeated spring semester in 2015 and alternate years. Friedman-Wheeler.

PSY 272G. International Service-Learning in Barbados (3 Cr.) (LER-SA)
PSY 272G/COM 272G is an international service-learning course that takes place in the nation of Barbados. Students either intern with Black Rock Psychiatric Hospital or the Media Campaign Watch with the Center for Gender Studies at the University of West Indies-Cave Hill, while simultaneously engaging in content-driven didactic seminars, structured critical reflection, guest lectures, and cultural excursions. Prerequisite: rising senior or junior status preferred. Winter, first offered 2012. Burton and Grayman-Simpson

PSY 275. Research Practicum in Psychology (4 Cr.) 
This course provides the opportunity for students to develop research skills in psychology, working closely with a faculty member and with peers. Focus will be on exposing students to various aspects of the research process, including research design, ethical and regulatory concerns and process, interacting with human research participants, managing and analyzing data, applying research findings to real-world problems (designing programs/interventions), and oral and written communication. Communication of research findings may be of particular focus and may include writing abstracts for submission to conferences, preparing and giving presentations on campus and at professional conferences, writing and revising manuscripts for submission to peer-reviewed journals, and providing feedback on others' work. This course may serve as preparation for more advanced collaborative research in PSY 375.   Prerequisites: PSY 111 and permission of instructor. Not offered 2015-2016 or 2016-2017. Department.

PSY 290. Internship in Psychology (3-4 Cr.) 
Placements available in clinical, school, business, research, and other related settings. Students participate on site under the supervision of professionals in the field and also completed specific assignment(s) as determined by the faculty internship sponsor. Graded pass/no-pass only. Prerequisites: four courses in psychology and permission of instructor. Department

PSY 295. Independent Work (1-4 Cr.) 
Special fields of study within psychology pursued independently under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite: PSY 111; Sophomore standing; and permission of the instructor. Department.

PSY 298. Mentored Research Team (1-4 Cr.) 
This course is designed for students to gain valuable research experience and skills by working on a faculty-mentored research team at a basic level in the planning and/or execution of an empirical research project. Graded pass/no pass only. Can be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: PSY 111, PSY 112, and permission of instructor. Department.

PSY 306. Research Seminar in the Psychology of Narrative and Meaning (4 Cr.) 
Narrative psychology uses the "storied" nature of human understanding as an integrating paradigm. This course considers the history, methods, and practicality of this perspective in the context of autobiography; identity; encounters and perceptions of self and others; and traumatic disruptions and recovery of self and community. Students use qualitative and literary/narrative methods to explore lived experience and the meanings they hold. Collaborative classroom engagement, including improvisational community-theatre work and storytelling/listening, are required. A qualitative research project and a 30-hour, community based learning experience are required. Prerequisites: PSY 255 and junior or senior standing, or permission of the instructor. Fall semester. Offered 2014 and alternate years. Pringle.

PSY 315. Seminar in Existential and Humanistic Psychology (4 Cr.) 
Advanced exploration of topic in the study of existential and/or humanistic psychology. Topics will be selected from the following: Self-determination theory; the autonomy-relatedness dialectic; terror management theory; Gestalt therapy; intensive study of specific theorists, such as Laing, May, and Rogers. Prerequisites: PSY 212 or PSY 230, and either PSY 252 or PSY 255, or permission of instructor. Spring semester. Patrick.

PSY 316. Seminar in History of Psychology (4 Cr.) 
Considerations of the antecedents and emergence of modern psychological theory, practice, and application. Particular themes and issues will include selected philosophical, scientific, and sociopolitical-historical influences; the early psychological "schools" and systems of thought; and the more contemporary, competing frameworks of cognitive psychology, social-humanistic psychology, and postmodernist approaches. This course will be conducted in seminar format and will require high-level classroom engagement, oral participation, and writing. Prerequisites: PSY 252 or PSY 255, completion of psychology cluster courses, and senior standing; or permission of instructor. Variable. Department.

PSY 321. Counseling Psychology (4 Cr.) 
Counseling Psychology is a specialty within professional psychology that maintains a focus on facilitating personal and interpersonal functioning across the lifespan. It privileges the use of scientific inquiries to: (1) understand and support people through periods of psychological, social, and emotional distress; (2) prevent abnormal psychological, social, and emotional functioning; and (3) promote optimal functioning. Counseling psychology is grounded in evidence-based, strengths-focused, culturally sensitive, socially just practices. Students develop proficiency in microcounseling skills, and apply them in 4 hours/week of practicum work with an online chat counseling service (i.e., Trevor Chat, RAINN, and Common Ground Crisis Hotline). Practicum placements require application, background checks, and training during the spring & summer prior to the start of the fall course. Placement sites require a year-long commitment. Counts as an "Advanced Practicum Experience" course in psychology. Does not count as a seminar.  Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing, and PSY 212 or PSY 220. Fall Semester. Grayman-Simpson.

PSY 328. Research Seminar in Relational Psychology (4 Cr.) 
A collaborative exploration of the social and psychological construction of "race" and "gender" in America and how they shape our lives, relationships, and communities, as well as how we might imagine and effect positive change. Relational and cultural theory will guide our encounters across race, gender, and other socially constructed political realities. Classes will be pedagogically complex, with shared responsibilities for respectfully discussing, brainstorming, problem-solving, and imagining our ways forward, using improvisational theatre, memoir, storytelling/listening/interpreting, case study, biography, phenomenology, and action research to mine knowledge, raise consciousness, and chart imaginative, collaborative interventions with positive outcomes. Prerequisites: PSY 226 or PSY 255, or permission of instructor. Fall semester. Offered 2016 and alternate years. Pringle.

PSY 329. Advanced Self-Directed Projects (4 Cr.) 
This course provides the opportunity for students to consult with each other toward identifying topics of individual interest in psychology and developing those interests into more fully developed projects and proposals. Projects may consist of empirical research; development of programs, services, or interventions, or creative artwork or writing. Students will review relevant literature and work with their instructor, a faculty project mentor, and their classmates to clarify and refine their interests into a well-defined topic of inquiry before moving toward the generation of a project proposal. Alternatively, some students may enter the class with a previously developed project proposal and will use the class as an opportunity to work toward implementation of their project. Counts as an "Advanced Practicum Experience" course in psychology. Does not count as a seminar. Prerequisite: Junior standing and at least 5 courses in psychology; or permission of the instructor. Spring semester. Patrick.

PSY 340. Seminar in Developmental Psychology (4 Cr.) 
In-depth study of a selected topic in developmental psychology. Topic may be a particular stage of life (e.g., infancy, childhood, old age) or a current research issue (e.g., maternal employment, day care, friendship development, moral development). For each topic, attention is given to theoretical underpinnings, methodological issues, assessment of current knowledge, and directions for future investigations. May be repeated for credit with different topics. Prerequisites: PSY 244 and PSY 252 or PSY 255, or permission of instructor. Fall semester. Choe.

PSY 345. Seminar in Experimental Psychology (4 Cr.) 
This seminar serves as an introduction to the experimental study of selected topics in perception and attention through a detailed examination of one or more selected topic(s). Topics are selected from among attention, sensory integration, comparative perception or other related topics. We will approach these topics in the context of the scientific method, research design, data collection techniques, and analytic strategies. May be repeated for credit with different topics. Prerequisites: PSY 233 and PSY 252 or PSY 255, or permission of instructor. Spring semester. Ghirardelli.

PSY 370. Social Psychology Seminar (4 Cr.) 
Selected topics in social psychology with emphasis on current research. Topics are selected from intrinsic motivation, group behavior, attitudes, and social influence. May be repeated for credit with different topics. Prerequisites: PSY 230, and PSY 252 or PSY 255, or permission of the instructor. Fall semester. Patrick.

PSY 375. Advanced Research Practicum (4 Cr.) 
This course provides the opportunity for students to further develop their research skills in psychology, working closely with a faculty member and with peers. Focus will be on specific skills within the research process, including research design, ethical and regulatory concerns and process, interacting with human research participants, managing and analyzing data, applying research findings to real-world problems (designing programs/interventions), and oral and written communication. Communication of research findings may be of particular focus and may include writing abstracts for submission to conferences, preparing and giving presentations on campus and at professional conferences, writing and revising manuscripts for submission to peer-reviewed journals, and providing feedback on others' work.  Prerequisites: PSY 252 or 255, PSY 275, junior or senior standing, and permission of instructor. Preference may be given to those who have taken PSY 275 (Research Practicum in Psychology. Not offered 2015-2016 or 2016-2017. Department.

PSY 376. Seminar in Physiological Psychology (4 Cr.) 
This seminar focuses on one or more specific topics relevant to physiological psychology, such as psychopharmacology, neuropsychological case studies, or other aspects of brain/behavior relationships. Prerequisites: PSY 237, and PSY 252 or PSY 255, or permission of the instructor. Fall semester. Department.

PSY 379. Seminar in Cultural Psychology (4 Cr.) 
Cultural psychology is a subfield within the areas of social psychology and cultural anthropology.  It involves the study of the interconnections between and among intergenerationally transmitted behaviors, meanings, and symbols, and psychological processes such as cognition, affect, personality structure, and behavior.  This particular seminar will: (1) consider anti-Black racism in its global context; (2) include anti-discrimination interpersonal response training; and (3) examine the culture and psychology of white racism from multiple perspectives including psychodynamic, clinical, behavioral, social psychological, and developmental psychological perspectives. May be repeated for credit with different topic.   Prerequisites: PSY 219 or PSY 226 or PSY 230, and PSY 252 or PSY 255, or permission of the instructor. Fall semester. Grayman-Simpson.

PSY 380. Seminar in Cognitive Psychology (4 Cr.) 
A detailed examination of one or more selected topic(s) in cognitive psychology, with an emphasis on critical evaluation of assumptions and methodologies for scientific study of the human mind. Topics may include: applied memory; cognitive perspectives on teaching and learning; representation of knowledge; psycholinguistics; problem solving; reasoning and decision making; case studies in cognitive processes. May be repeated for credit with different topics. Prerequisites: ED 207 or PSY 207 or PSY 202 or PSY 235, and PSY 252 or PSY 255, or permission of the instructor. Spring semester. McCabe.

PSY 386. Seminar in Clinical Psychology (4 Cr.) 
In-depth examination of selected topics in advanced clinical psychology. Topics include a discussion of theoretical and social issues in the prevention and treatment of psychological disorders. May be repeated for credit with different topics. Prerequisite: PSY 271 and PSY 252 or PSY 255, or permission of the instructor. Spring semester. Friedman-Wheeler.

PSY 390. Advanced Internship in Psychology (3-4 Cr.) 
Placements available in clinical, school, business, research, and other related settings. Students participate on site under the supervision of professionals in the field, and also complete substantive academic work at an advanced level as determined by the faculty internship sponsor. Counts as an "Advanced Practicum Experience" course in psychology. Does not count as a seminar. Must be taken for a letter grade. Prerequisites: PSY 290 and junior or senior standing; and permission of instructor. Department.

PSY 392. Senior Colloquium (1 Cr.) 
Speakers from on and off campus will provide different perspectives on psychological topics and issues at departmental colloquia. Student discussion and evaluation of the presentations will be facilitated by the department faculty members in order to aid students’ integration of the different perspectives. Prerequisite: PSY 252 or PSY 255. Variable.Department.

PSY 398. Advanced Mentored Research Team (1-4 Cr.) 
Planning and executing an empirical research project on a faculty-mentored research team at an advanced level. Counts as an "Advanced Practicum Experience" course in psychology. Does not count as a seminar. Can be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 5 courses in psychology, including PSY 252 or PSY 255; PSY 298 or PSY 275; junior or senior standing; and permission of instructor. Department.

PSY 450. Senior Thesis (4/4 Cr.) 
Fall and spring semesters.Department.