The two questions that faculty in programs must answer are the same that they address when identifying learning goals for their courses:

  • What do I want students to know?
  • What do I want them to be able to do when they graduate with a degree in this field?

Program learning goals help faculty plan the curriculum, assess coherence and sequencing, and evaluate the learning of majors. In addition, they signal the department’s disciplinary identity and provide a common language that students, faculty, and staff share. This common language can facilitate communication and build bridges among various departmental services for students, such as advising and instruction.

Use of learning goals helps departments think about curriculum. When learning goals are defined, departments and programs can determine the courses that address each goal. Curricular maps can reveal desired and undesired redundancies, overlaps, and gaps in programs for majors.

Bachelor of Arts American Studies
Art and Art History
Biology
Business Management
Chemistry
Communications
Computer Science
Dance
Economics
Education
English
Frontiers
General Education Requirements
History
Mathematics
Modern Languages
Music
Philosophy
Physics
Political Science and International Relations
Psychology
Religion
Sociology
Theatre
Women's Studies
Other Undergraduate Outcomes First-Year Experience
Student Leadership Program
Co-Curricular
Library
Master of Arts Arts Administration
Cultural Sustainability
Digital Arts
Teaching
Master of Education Athletic Leadership
At-Risk Children and Youth
Leadership
Middle Level Education Area
Reading
Teacher as Leader in Technology
Urban Education
Master of Fine Arts Creative Nonfiction