WL 210. Cross-Cultural Issues in Nationality and Identity (3 Cr.) (GEN. ED. # 9 and #10)
This course is organized around a rotating series of themes that explore interdisciplinary analysis of culture around the globe. Specific topics for the semester to be announced in advanced. Spring semester. Offered 2009-10 and alternate years.Department.

WL 230. Special Topics in African Literature and Film (3 Cr.) (GEN. ED. #9 and #10)
This course, organized around a rotating thematic topic in a given semester, focuses on the construction of identity in post-colonial Africa and its varied expressions in literature and cinema. The examination of how contemporary cinematic and literary forms describe and react to the postcolonial condition highlights themes of dislocation and alienation, as well as issues of readership and audience in and out of Africa.. Topic announced prior to registration. Can be repeated if different topic. Prerequisite: sophomore or permission of instructor. Can be taken in conjunction with FR 231. Spring semester. Offered 2014-15 and alternate years. Martin.

WL 250. Special Topics in Modern German Culture (4 Cr.) (LER-TXT)(LER-DIV)
Rotating topics in German film and culture of the 20th century: Berlin-divided and united; survey of 20th-century German and Austrian culture; Berlin-Vienna: two metropolises in the 20th century. Readings and discussions in English, with an optional German language component (two credits). Highly recommended for students taking GER 130G in Berlin. May be repeated if topic is different. Spring semester. Larkey.

WL 253. The Soul of Russia: Russian Culture and Civilization (3 Cr.) (LER-TXT)
Students will learn about Russian traditions, folklore, conceptions of the world, and the search for national identity in juxtaposition with Russian history and literature.  Seven topics will be covered using literature, music, cuisine and dance.  At the 300-level students are required to complete a research paper and a capstone project that includes work in the Russian language done through reading and written assignments or through a documented community-based learning capstone project with the instructor’s permission.  The course is taught in English.   Prerequisite: none. Alternating years, Spring semester. Offered 2014. Czeczulin.

WL 254. Russian Literature: Revolution and Purge (3 Cr.) (GEN. ED. #9)
Political, social, and ideological factors in the development of Russian literature. A study of leading Russian authors and the conflicts between artistic freedom and political conformity. Prerequisite: college writing proficiency. Variable semestersDepartment.

WL 259. Dimensions of the Russian Literary Mind: The Saint, the Madman, and the Dreamer (3 Cr.) (GEN. ED. #9)
Survey of Russian literature from its beginning in the 12th century, with emphasis on the great works that exemplify the traits and characteristics of the Russian religious and literary mind. Prerequisite: college writing proficiency. Variable semesters.Department.

WL 260. Special Topics in European Literature (3 Cr.) 
This course examines a theme in European literature in historical content, across diverse national cultural traditions and with attention to other genres of artistic expression such as music, cinema, theatre and the fine arts. Through analysis of these diverse engagements with a common theme, this course explores the cultural diversity of Europe and the ways Europeans today are both drawing on and recasting a rich cultural heritage to address social issues today. Prerequisites: none. Course may be repeated if topic is different. Spring semester.Department.

WL 269. The Russian Fairytale (3 Cr.) (GEN. ED. #9) (LER-TXT)
A survey course of Russian oral and subsequent written traditions using multimedia and presented against the background of the Indo-European tradition. Taught in English. One-credit Russian language option. Fall semester. Czeczulin.

WL 353. Soul of Russia: Russian Culture and Civilization (4 Cr.) 
Students will learn about Russian traditions, folklore, conceptions of the world, and the search for national identity in juxtaposition with Russian history and literature.  Seven topics will be covered using literature, music, cuisine and dance.  At the 300-level students are required to complete a research paper and a capstone project that includes work in the Russian language done through reading and written assignments or through a documented community-based learning capstone project with the instructor’s permission.  The course is taught in English.   Prerequisite: RUS 251 Alternating years, Spring semester. Offered 2014. Czeczulin.