GER 110. Elements of German I (4 Cr.) 
Designed to give students a firm foundation in the language: grammar, vocabulary, composition, and oral practice. Course will develop reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. Course focuses on communicative approach, stressing contemporary cultural issues and using authentic texts and materials. Four contact hours with instructor. Prerequisite: placement. A minimum grade of C- must be attained to advance to the next level. Fall semester.Larkey. Krueger.

GER 120. Elements of German II (4 Cr.) 
A continuation of previous work with abundant oral and aural practice, course focuses on communicative approach stressing contemporary cultural issues. Four contact hours with instructor, Prerequisite: GER 110 with a minimum grade of C-. Spring semester.Larkey and Krueger.

GER 129. Gateway to Germany (1 Cr.) 
This is a seven-week required precursor course for students participating in the intensive course abroad in Berlin, Germany. The course is taught in English and focuses on cultural and language preparation for an intensive study-abroad experience. All students going to Berlin must enroll in this course. Prerequisite: GER 120 or instructor’s permission. Highly recommended in combination with GER 250. This course is graded pass/no pass only. Spring semester.Larkey and Krueger.

GER 130. Intermediate German (4 Cr.) (GEN. ED. #2) (LER–FL)
A continuation of GER 110 and GER 120, this course focuses on the further acquisition of linguistic skills (understanding oral and written German, speaking, and writing) taught in cultural context. Course reviews and expands fundamentals of grammar, concentrates on vocabulary building and active use of the language. In addition to reading contemporary texts, the course focuses on communicative approach, stressing contemporary cultural issues. Four contact hours with instructor. Prerequisite: GER 120 with a minimum grade of C-. Fall semester.Larkey and Krueger.

GER 130G. Intermediate German—Berlin, Germany (4 Cr.) (GEN. ED. #2 and #3) (LER–FL and LER-SA)
A three-week intensive course in Berlin. Students will take daily German language and cultural Classes at the Neue Schule,, and will visit numerous cultural and historical sites. Berlin, one of the most exciting European cities, provides a rich culture and unique history, as well as many opportunities for casual and formal conversation. Excursions will bring to life many of the topics covered in the course. To get a genuine taste of German life and to practice the language, all students will stay with host families. Prerequisite: GER 129 and GER 120 with a minimum grade of C-. Highly recommended: GER 250. May/June. Larkey.

GER 233. Modern German History: From Unification to Unification (3 Cr.) (GEN. ED. #4) (LER-TXT)
German reunification (1990) has transformed a range of recent and continuing debates on recent German history, including the character of the Wilhelmine Empire, the outbreak of World War I, fascism, the Holocaust, and the post-1945 German states. The course develops a framework for understanding the controversies relating to issues of national identity and collective memory that shape the writing of this history. Readings and discussions in English. Prerequisite: HIS 117 recommended. Variable semesters. Beachy.

GER 234. Conversation and Composition (4 Cr.) (LER–TXT)
Special topics: Development of conversation and writing skills through the study and discussion of written and visual texts, shorts, and full-length films. The course will provide insights into contemporary cultural, social, and political topics. Students will write professional letters, essays, editorials, film reviews, analyze short texts and films, and give presentations in German. The course will emphasize vocabulary acquisition, active use of idiomatic expressions, conversation, grammatical concepts, and composition. May be repeated if topic is different. Prerequisite: GER 130 with a minimum grade of C- (or equivalent). Fall semester.Department.

GER 240. Introduction to German, Austrian and Swiss Literatures and Writers. Rotating Topics (3 Cr.) (LER–TXT)
The course acquaints students with major literary movements, influential texts and authors in the 20th and 21st century. In addition, students explore the historical contexts in which these texts were written. Special attention is given to reading strategies, introduction to textual analysis, and improving speaking and listening skills. Students will read literary texts such as poems, short stories, and novels, produce short papers (e.g. book reviews, film reviews, and response papers), and give presentations in German. Taught in German. May be repeated if topic is different. Prerequisite: GER 130 with a minimum grade of C- (or equivalent). Spring semester.Department.

GER 250. Special Topics in Modern German Culture (4 Cr.) (LER–TXT AND DIV)
Rotating topics in German film and culture of the 20th century: Berlin-divided and united; survey of 20th-century German and Austrian culture; Berlin-Vienna: two metropolises in the 20th century; Multicultural Germany. Readings and discussions in English. Highly recommended for students taking GER 130G in Berlin. May be repeated if topic is different. Spring semester.Larkey.

GER 251. Jews in Germany From the Enlightenment to the Rise of the Nazi Regime (3 Cr.) (LER–TXT)
This course focuses on the history of German Jews from the period of emancipation in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century to the end of the Weimar Republic. We will examine the role of German Jews in German politics, economic life, and culture; Jewish enlightenment (“Haskalah”); the rise of anti-Semitism in the nineteenth century; the rise of the Reform movement; Jewish assimilation and its discontents; and the Weimar Jewish Renaissance. Fall semester.Larkey.

GER 259. Oral Histories of Holocaust Survivors—Telling Their Stories (3 Cr.) (GEN. ED. #4 and #10) (LER–TXT)
A community-based learning experience in which students interview Holocaust survivors and retell their stories to help these stories live on after the Holocaust survivor generation has passed. Training in interviewing techniques and storytelling will be provided. Readings and discussions in English. Students will be expected to interview survivors, record sessions, and publicly present the survivors’ stories. Recommended: GER 260/HIS 229/JS 246 and JS 245 or permission of instructor. Fall semester. Larkey.

GER 260. History, Literature, and Film on the Holocaust (4 Cr.) (GEN. ED. #9) (LER–TXT)
Beginning with the historical factors that led to the Holocaust, this course further focuses on the analysis of literary works (memoirs, diaries, poems, fiction, etc.) and films (documentaries and features) on the Holocaust within the historical context of World War II. Readings and discussions in English (films with English subtitles). Spring semester.Larkey.

GER 272G. Intensive Course Abroad (3 Cr.) (GEN. ED. #3) (LER-SA)
HIGH-INTERMEDIATE/ADVANCED GERMAN—BERLIN, GERMANY A three-week intensive course in Berlin, Germany. After an online placement test, students will take daily German language classes at the Neue Schule and will visit numerous cultural and historical sites. Berlin, one of the most exciting European cities, provides a rich culture and unique history, as well as many opportunities for casual and formal conversation. Excursions will bring to life many of the topics covered in the course. To get a genuine taste of German life and to practice the language, all students will stay with host families. Prerequisite: GER 130 with a minimum grade of C-. Highly recommended: GER 250. Summer. Larkey. FILM IN BERLIN (4) (COM 272G) This course will take the students “on location” to Berlin. It will not only provide an overview of Berlin as a historic and modern city of film, but will also explore significant aspects of the contemporary film industry at the sites in Berlin. Students will discuss and write about “Berlin films.” They will also opportunities to meet with representatives of film production and marketing companies, film schools, film festivals and the Film Commission. Prerequisite: GER 129 Summer. Larkey and Peroutka.

GER 290. Internship in German (3-4 Cr.) 
This course is graded pass/no pass only. Department.

GER 299. Independent Work (1-4 Cr.) 
Department.

GER 395. Senior Seminar (4 Cr.) 
This course is designed for students who wish to minor in German and have acquired the necessary credits. The selection of topics is closely linked to the students’ direction of study and can be broadened or narrowed as needed. All readings are in German. Emphasis is on independent research and seminar papers. Use of the Internet is strongly encouraged. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Variable semesters.Department.

German courses at Loyola College and Johns Hopkins University may count toward the minor in German.

  • GER 201. German Composition and Conversation (if Goucher GER 234 is unavailable)
  • GER 216.02. Reading Strategies
  • GER 315.01. Modern German Short Story
  • GER 358. Modern German Drama

For other courses, consult the Loyola College and the Johns Hopkins University catalogues.