FR 110. Elements of French I (4 Cr.) 
This first course of the two-semester sequence is an introduction to the French language. Students will achieve elementary proficiency in the four skills of reading, writing, speaking, and oral comprehension.  No Prerequisite. A minimum grade of C- must be attained to advance to FR 120. Fall and spring semesters.

FR 120. Elements of French II (4 Cr.) 
This second course of the two-semester sequence is a continuation of FR 110. At the completion of the series, students will have achieved basic proficiency in the four skills of reading, writing, speaking, and oral comprehension.  Prerequisite: Placement test or at least a C- in FR 110. A minimum grade of C- must be attained to advance to FR 130. Fall and spring semesters.

FR 130. Intermediate French (4 Cr.) (LER-FL)
This capstone course focuses on the attainment of intermediate-level proficiency. Listening, speaking, reading and writing skills are taught in cultural context. Includes close reading of short pieces by Francophone authors, viewing of audiovisual materials, and discussion of particular cultural elements in the target language. Opportunities to use the language outside of class include Language House activities, or a teaching assistantship in FR 110 or FR 120. Interested students may also enroll in FR 272Y during the second seven weeks of the spring semester starting in 2017. Prerequisite: Placement test or FR 120 with a minimum grade of C-.  Fall and spring semesters.

FR 131. French Theatre Introductory Course (2 Cr.) 
This seven-week course offered during the second half of the semester is intended for students who are at the 130-level and enrolled in the French Theatre ICA (FR THE 272Y). At the end of the seven weeks, students take the FR THE 272Y pre-course offered the same semester and then study abroad in the summer. They may also take the fall component of the ICA (2 cr) during which students stage a play in French. Spring semester.

FR 209. Advanced French Language I (8 Cr.) 
This third-year course includes a thorough grammar review, vocabulary-building exercises, the study of idiomatic structures, textual exegeses, and written composition. An important component is a phonetics practicum that aims to improve a student's pronunciation through intensive drills in the language laboratory and through individual conferences with the instructor for diagnosis and correction of particular pronunciation problems.

FR 212. Applied French Practicum (4 Cr.) 
This program in Paris provides students the opportunity to improve French beyond the classroom. For the Practicum, students choose from three activity plans to form an individualized learning experience. The Practicum involves approximately sixteen hours of work weekly.  Students choose a type of field experience: 1) conversational internship; 2) volunteer work and research on a subject of French society or culture; or 3) research on a topic of current events including interviews, meetings, informational visits to relevant sites, use of libraries, archives and centers of documentation.

FR 231. L-T-L Special Topics in African Literature and Film (1 Cr.) 
This Linkage-Through-Language course is an option for students proficient in French and concurrently enrolled in WL 230. Students meet and discuss (in French) various francophone texts related to the general syllabus of WL 230. Written assignments are also in French. Co-requisite with WL 230 and approval of the instructor. Spring semester 2015 and alternate years. Martin.

FR 233. Conversation and Composition (4 Cr.) 
Development of comprehension, conversation and writing skills through the study of French films, television programs, readings of contemporary texts and current events. A variety of assignments focus on how to write a summary, a literary or cinematic analysis, a research paper, or a translation. Some review of grammar. Prerequisite: FR 130 with a minimum grade of C-. Fall and spring semesters.

FR 245. Bouillon De Culture-Introduction to French Studies (4 Cr.) (LER-TXT AND DIV)
This course traces significant themes in the evolution of French culture from the Middle Ages to the post-World War II era. It prepares students to integrate concepts and methods drawn from the social sciences and the humanities in the study of French and Francophone culture. Special attention is given to building a cogent argument in French (oral and written), cinematic and textual analysis, and to the critical reading of sources in French history. Prerequisite: one 200-level French course. Fall and spring semesters. Ingram, Martin, St. Ours.

FR 252. Paris-France-Paris (3 Cr.) 
This course centers on Paris as a French cultural center and on the history of Paris and its relationship with France. Themes include: urbanization, cultural geography and understanding the Grand Paris in the French cultural and socio-political nexus. In its focus on the contemporary period, it pays special attention to recent state projects such as L’Institut du Monde Arabe, le Palais de Tokyo, and the Museum of Immigration. On-site visits included.

FR 253. Introduction to French/Francophone Cinema (4 Cr.) 
A survey of French/Francophone cinema, this course introduces students to the history of French/Francophone film, various approaches to film and modes of film analysis. It also teaches French film terminology. Prerequisite: FR 233 or permission of instructor. Variable semesters. First offered Fall 2012. Martin, St. Ours.

FR 257. Decoding French & Francophone Narratives (4 Cr.) 
Through analysis of multiple engagements with a common theme, this course explores the artistic diversity of France and the Francophone world through literature, music, the visual arts and music, for example. A comparative approach will be used to study the interconnectedness of various genres and media. Special attention will be given to the development of skills required to interpret literary as well as non-literary texts. Sample topics include: monsters and the grotesque; remakes and re-writings; figures of enchantment; physical and moral ruins; the flâneur and Wanderlust.  Prerequisite: FR 245 or permission of the instructor. Alternate years. Martin, St. Ours.

FR 258. Current Events in Fifth-Republic France (4 Cr.) (LER-TXT AND DIV)
This course examines contemporary French society in the context of the major social and cultural changes of the Fifth Republic era. Students gain an understanding of singularity of recent issues of culture and identity in France by situating them with respect to their historical antecedents. A key focus of the course is the distinctive French democratic tradition and its recent evolution. Prerequisite: one 200-level French course. Spring semester. Offered 2015 and alternate years. Ingram.

FR 272Y. Intensive Course Abroad (6 OR 8 Cr.) (LER-ARC)(LER-SA)
  FRENCH THEATRE IN PARIS AND MARSEILLE: LANGUAGES OF PERFORMANCE (This course is an experiential introduction to the dynamic world of the contemporary French theatre in Avignon, Marseille, and Paris. Students get to know each area through French theatre artists (amateurs, students, and professionals). Building on longstanding exchanges, the course furthers language skills in immersion environments such as homestay families, theatre workshops, and cooking classes. Experienced theatre students profit from direct engagement with French traditions of acting and staging, while beginners discover and develop skills such as vocal projection, stage presence, and characterization. For all students, theatre offers tools for developing conversational ease in French while plays and performances provide a window into contemporary French culture. The capstone project is a production presented as part of the Goucher Theatre program's fall program. Each student's participation is based on the individual's skills and interests and might include an acting role, work with includes a seven week component in the spring, a three-week program abroad in May/June, and a seven-week component in the fall. Seniors and others unable to participate in the fall may take only the spring and May/June components for 6 credits.Spring/summer/fall semesters. Offered 2015 and alternate years. Free and Ingram. International Field Experience More advanced students who have completed FR 245 may qualify for the International Field Experience in Paris, Brussels or Strasbourg. After five weeks of intensive course work in French and European history, culture and politics, each student interns on a full-time basis for fourteen weeks and simultaneously carries out a major research project. Placements are chosen according to the student's interests and/or career plans. Fall and spring semesters.

FR 290. Internship in French (3-4 Cr.) 
Projects in which students make use of their foreign language skills in a work environment in this country or abroad with a government agency, business, or nonprofit organization. This course is graded pass/no pass only.

FR 295. L-T-L Anthropology of France (1 Cr.) 
Students enroll simultaneously in ANT 238/HIS 227 and follow the syllabus of that course while pursuing an additional unit of study in French. This section meets for two hours alternate weeks to discuss readings and films and to hear guest speakers. Final project must be in French. Prerequisite: FR 130 or 200-level proficiency in French. Approval of instructor required before enrollment. Fall semester. Alternate years. Ingram.

FR 299. Independent Work (1-4 Cr.) 
Pending approval of instructor and chair. Variable semesters Department

FR 330. Special Topics in French Literature (4 Cr.) 
Exploration of a theme in French literature. Topic varies from year to year (e.g., French Women Authors, Love in French Literature, French Cinema, L'Écriture de la Révélation, The New Wave Cinema, Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Humanism, The Age of Enlightenment). Required readings and written essays in French. May be repeated for credit if topic is different. Prerequisites: FR 245 or FR 257. Fall or Spring (variable). Martin and St. Ours.

FR 333. Special Topics in French Culture and Civilization (4 Cr.) 
Exploration of a theme in contemporary French society. Conducted in a seminar format, this course encourages the oral participation of students. Topic varies from year to year (e.g., the French through their food, generations and social change since 1945, Marseille: between Europe and the Mediterranean). May be repeated for credit if topic is different. Prerequisite: FR 245, or FR 258. Spring semester. Offered 2016 and alternate years. Ingram.

FR 344. French Environmental Studies (4 Cr.) (LER-ENV)
This course is devoted to environmental issues important in France and Francophone countries but which clearly concern the whole world. We will explore current ecological issues such as global warming, the opening of the Northwest Passage, genetically modified organisms, nuclear energy, the relationship between human and non-human animals, alter-globalization, green party politics, etc., from a pluri-disciplinary perspective. These viewpoints may include politics, science, history, philosophy, demography, economics and geography, for example, expressed in media such as the press, the cinema, music, and literature.  Prerequisites: FR 245 or IP. Variable semesters. St. Ours.

FR 351. Topics in Francophone African Literature & Cinema (4 Cr.) 
Topics in Francophone African Literature and Cinema is a series of rotating courses  examining cultural texts from the 20th and 21st centuries, produced in French in Western and North Africa. Topics have included: Women's Francophone Literature; West-African Cinema; Violence and Reconciliation in Sub-Saharan Literature; The Cinema of the Maghreb. Repeatable if topic is different. Prerequisite: FR 245 or IP. Fall semester. Alternate years. Martin.

FR 450. Senior Thesis (4/4 Cr.) 
These individual senior projects directed by members of the French section need to be determined during the junior year. Please see the section "Honors in French Major" above. Ingram, Martin, St. Ours.

FRENCH THEATRE IN PARIS AND MARSEILLE: LANGUAGES OF PERFORMANCE (6 OR 8) (THE 272Y) (LER SA)
This course is an experiential introduction to the dynamic world of the contemporary French theatre in Avignon, Marseille, and Paris. Students get to know each area through French theatre artists (amateurs, students, and professionals). Building on longstanding exchanges between these artists and Goucher students and faculty, the course furthers language skills in immersion environments such as homestay families, theatre workshops, and cooking classes. Experienced theatre students profit from direct engagement with French traditions of acting and staging, while beginners discover and develop skills such as vocal projection, stage presence, and characterization. For all students, theatre offers tools for developing conversational ease in French while plays and performances provide a window into contemporary French culture. The capstone project is a Goucher Theatre Department production presented as part of the Department's fall program. Each student's participation is based on the individual's skills and interests. Students may choose to perform an acting role, contribute to visual elements such as costumes or scenery, perform dance or music, participate as a producer/administrator, or pursue research relevant to the production. This 8-credit course (4 in French, 4 in theatre) includes a sevenweek component in the spring, a three-week program abroad in May/June, and a seven-week component in the fall. Seniors and others unable to participate in the fall may take only the Spring and May/June components for 6 credits.

PARIS PROGRAM (STUDY-ABROAD IN FRENCH): FALL AND SPRING
In order to qualify for the Paris program, students need to have completed two courses at the 200 level, one of which must be FR 245. Participants in the Goucher College Paris program take required courses and are placed into a half-time internship connected with a semester-long research project. The resulting research essay (written in French) needs to be shared with the faculty of the department upon the student's return from Paris on campus. All courses are taught in French. The following are required: 209 or 210 (depending on individual placement evaluation upon arrival at the Sorbonne), FR 290P and FR 252.
Department.