Upon declaring the environmental studies major, students choose one of two concentrations: environmental science (ESCI) or environment and society (ESOC). Students complete all required courses within their chosen concentration as well as a set of required courses designed to cultivate breadth. All environmental studies students complete the environmental studies core curriculum consisting of introductory, mid-level, and capstone courses. At the introductory level, all students (majors and minors) take courses spanning the natural and social sciences. Introductory courses in environmental science and environmental studies are designed to introduce students to the biological, physical, and chemical science of environmental change, as well as the human dimensions (social/political/cultural/economic) of such change.

At the 200 level, all environmental studies majors complete the core courses ES 210 and ES 230 Political Ecology, which draws from and integrates a range of disciplines to help students master a set of key concepts and analytical methods fundamental to environmental studies. During their senior year, students actively integrate the approaches and methodologies they have practiced and experimented with at the 100 and 200 levels toward further research on particular problem, issue, or theme of their choosing, based on their research and future career interests. This integration starts in a methodology course in which students select an environmental issue and propose to address it, and the integration culminates in the capstone course in which students implement their research proposal. Completing an internship is encouraged, but not required.

All majors must complete the Environmental Studies core sequence, as follows:

  • ES 100 - Introduction to Environmental Sciences (3.5 Cr.) Note: M or higher on the math placement test is required for this course.
  • ES 140 - Introduction to Environmental Studies (3 Cr.)
  • ES 210 - Biosphere and Society (3 Cr.)
  • ES 230 - Political Ecology: Culture, Politics, and Environmental Change (3 Cr.)
  • ES 390 - Environmental Studies Senior Capstone (3 Cr.)
  • EC 101 - Principles of Economics: Micro (3 Cr.) Note: M or higher on the math placement test is required for this course.
  • EC 225 - Environmental Economics (3 Cr.) Note: M or higher on the math placement test is required for this course.

Writing proficiency in the major is fulfilled in ES 230 Political Ecology.

Majors choose a concentration in either Environment and Society (ESOC) or Environmental Science (ESCI) and complete required courses and breadth requirements. Students must receive at least a C- in all courses taken toward the completion of the major or minor.

Concentrations

Environment and Society Concentration (ESOC)

For more in-depth information, click here to view the academic catalogue.

Additional courses:

  • ES 219 or an authorized methodology course
  • Two additional 200-level ES courses
  • Two 300-level ES courses


Breadth for ESOC:

Choose one:

  • BIO 104 
  • CHE 105 and CHE 106  
  • CHE 111 and CHE 112


Choose one:

  • EC 206
  • MA 140
  • MA 141


Choose one:

  • ES 200
  • ES 204
  • ES 238

Environmental Science Concentration (ESCI)

For more in-depth information, click here to view the academic catalogue.

Additional courses:

  • BIO 104 
  • CHE 111 and CHE 112 
  • CHE 151 and CHE 152
  • CHE 230 - Organic Chemistry I (4 Cr.)


Choose Life Science or Physical Science focus:

Life Science:

    • BIO 210, BIO 214, BIO 220, BIO 240, and two 300-level BIO courses

Physical Science:

      • ES 200 or ES 238 
      • PHY 115 or PHY 125 
      • PHY 250 or CHE 270
      • Two 300-level courses: CHE 355 or ES 315 or ES 330 or ES 399

Breadth for ESCI:

Choose one:

      • EC 206, MA 140, MA 141, or MA 168

Concentration in Prelaw Studies

Students interested in pursuing a legal career are encouraged to complete the prelaw concentration in conjunction with the requirements of the major (ESOC or ESCI). The prelaw concentration requires students to take courses outside of their major to expose them to methodologies and critical approaches not inherent to their own discipline but necessary for academic success in law school. A complete description can be found under Prelaw Studies.