COM 105. Introduction to Communication Studies (3 Cr.) 
This course introduces students to the history and development of human communication in all its forms, from the introduction of the phonetic alphabet in ancient Greece to the invention of virtual reality. Students are encouraged to look for patterns of change and continuity while examining the role of scribes, the introduction of the printing press, and the pervasive communication technologies of the 20th century, from the radio to the satellite. Relationships among technology, ideas, social relations, and political realities will be explored. Legal, philosophical, and ethical debates surrounding the introduction and use of these technologies will be stressed. Fall semester, repeated spring semester Burton, Kimball, Marcus, Zurawik.

COM 132. Writing for Film, Television, and Radio (3 Cr.) (GEN. ED. #8)
This course, an introduction to the various forms of writing for radio, television, and film, will cover the basic principles and practices of advertising writing, radio and television news and feature writing, and the elements of dramatic script writing. Prerequisite: college writing proficiency. Fall semester, repeated spring semester.Stoehr, Peroutka.

COM 180. Audio Production (3 Cr.) 
The acting techniques and sound technology of live and recorded performance in radio/audio production. Emphasis on limited-time production. Fall semester, repeated spring semester. Hudson.

COM 189. Studio Television Production (4 Cr.) (GEN. ED. #8)
An introduction to the techniques and aesthetics of studio television production. Students will explore multicamera videography, producing and directing, staging and graphics, lighting for standard and dramatic effect, the correlation of audio and visual compositional elements, and the aesthetic of online editing. Students will also learn basic coordination of on-camera talent. The process and practice of studio production as an artistic and expressive medium will be emphasized. Spring semester. Hudson, Raymond.

COM 202. Basic Photography (4 Cr.) (GEN. ED. #8) (LER-ARC)
This course will introduce the basic concepts of camera vision and black and white photographic materials. The chief goal of the course is to provide you with technical skills and visual theory to produce photographs that reflect both your interests and your view of the world. You will learn to operate all the major controls of the camera, expose negatives accurately, and produce a range of black and white prints. Through lectures, demonstrations, readings, and discussions, you will be encouraged to pursue your own ideas and interest in response to assignments. This course is designed for students with previous experience and for beginners with no experience. Prerequisite: ART 102 or sophomore standing. Students must have their own 35mm film camera. Fall semester, repeated spring semester. Worteck, Burns, department.

COM 203. Intermediate Photography (4 Cr.) (GEN. ED. #8)
This course extends and deepens the skills acquired in Basic Photography. You will broaden your understanding of film exposure and printing controls, explore artificial light sources and flash, and experiment with films and papers. Projects are designed to engage with ideas about genres of photography while simultaneously increasing technical knowledge and skills. The course will include darkroom work, lectures, readings, and field trips. Students must have their own 35mm film camera. Prerequisite: ART 201 or COM 202. Fall semester, repeated spring semester.Worteck, Burns, department.

COM 205. Debunked! Environmental Writing & Communication (3 Cr.) 
This 200-level environmental communication and writing class will focus on improving scientific literacy across a variety of media. We will prepare students to be intelligent consumers of popular environmental discourse, able to distinguish valid science-based information from disinformation. As well, the course will stress competent science-based environmental writing. Students will be expected to understand science-based articles in newspapers, magazines, and journals; and scientifically-themed television programming. Assignments will include a letter to the editor, a storyboard for a television episode, a corporate press release, an NGO white paper, and an in-depth research article. The course will focus on environmental and sustainability-based subjects.       Prerequisite: College Writing Proficiency requirement. Fall, first offered 2012. Minkoff-Zern, Peroutka.

COM 208. Photography in Communication and Art (3 Cr.) 
Visual requirements in photography and graphics for art, advertising, journalism, public relations, and media (including documentaries) from still to slide/sound. This course involves production, analysis, decision making, and technology. Prerequisites: ART 201 and ART 203 or COM 202 and COM 203. Fall semester. Offered alternate years.Worteck.

COM 209. Photojournalism and Documentary Photography (3 Cr.) 
An examination of the development of photojournalism and the documentary essay. Lecture and slide presentations on the significant historical and critical developments in the field. The role of photography in propaganda and media manipulation, including a detailed investigation of the techniques and editorial practices that subvert the medium to reinforce various doctrines and ideologies. Included are a series of simulated editorial assignments that are then combined with lectures and demonstrations of techniques appropriate to this photographic genre. Students are required to write a proposal and execute a documentary/essay portfolio. Prerequisites: ART 203, COM 203, or permission of the instructor. Fall semester. Offered alternate years.Worteck.

COM 210. History of Photography (3 Cr.) 
The history of photography from the earliest manifestations to the present. Prerequisite: ART 103 or permission of instructor. Fall semester. Worteck, Burns.

COM 213. Making Sense of Popular Culture (3 Cr.) (GEN. ED. #10) (LER - DIV)
Popular culture: We eat, breathe, wear, play, learn, and live it. From McDonald's to MTV, this course traces the postwar development of American popular/consumer culture, emphasizing its penetration into and ubiquity in our everyday lives; its influence on self, group, and national identity; its place in the establishment of our contemporary sense of community; and its global reach. The course addresses issues of race, gender, class, and other factors that are both shaped and reflected by popular culture myths, icons, and formulas. Prerequisites: COM 105, COM 132, and college writing proficiency, and sophomore standing; or permission of instructor. Spring semester. Kimball, Peroutka, Zurawik.

COM 219. History of Television and Radio (4 Cr.) (GEN. ED. #4 and #9) (LER-TXT)
An examination of the historical evolution of electronic media in the United States and other countries. Radio, television, and new media technologies are investigated from a number of perspectives, including technology, business and industry, programming, law, and society and culture. Prerequisites: COM 105, COM 132, college writing proficiency, and sophomore standing; or permission of the instructor. Spring semester. Offered alternate years. Marcus, Zurawik.

COM 225. Consumerism, the Media, Popular Culture and the Environment (4 Cr.) (GEN. ED. #11) (LER–ENV)
This course will examine the relationship between culture and environment. We will focus on how the mass media and popular culture create and perpetuate the mythology of the American Dream and the “good life”—with all its material abundance and consequent wastefulness. How does our culture talk about various forms of consumption? What is the relationship between the media, cultural and political elites, corporate entities, and the consumer? How do we, as an audience, receive, internalize, and operationalize these messages? And how can we escape the mantra of “more is better”? The course will include a strong experiential component meant to encourage students to live in more sustainable ways. Prerequisites: COM 105, COM 132, college writing proficiency, and sophomore standing; or permission of instructor. Fall semester. Peroutka

COM 227. Media and Technology (3 Cr.) 
This course will explore how new media technologies have shaped and complicated our culture and society. The course will consider new media of today and yesterday, including printing, comics, television, the web and digital media, focusing on the social construction of technology and how media technologies help foster our sense of identity and social reality. Students will examine this subject through a critical lens, grounded in historical research. Prerequisites: COM 105, COM 132, college writing proficiency, and sophomore standing; or permission of the instructor. Offered alternate years. Burton, Kimball.

COM 228. Expressive Use of Voice and Movement (3 Cr.) 
Expansion of the physical and vocal range of the performer and public speaker. The course examines methods of interpreting dramatic text through voice and movement, studies the physiological and psychological components of speech and movement, and focuses on the connection between stage speech and stage movement. Six class hours. Prerequisite: THE 120. Spring semester. Offered alternate years.Free.

COM 231. News Reporting (3 Cr.) 
This course trains students in the fundamentals of gathering information and presenting it as journalism. The course will offer students the opportunity to learn and practice basic news gathering and writing in conditions intended to simulate a newsroom. This is primarily a skills course. In emphasizing journalism as a discipline of verification, however, the course also introduces students to a culture of journalism that stresses accuracy and ethics. Prerequisite: sophomore standing and college writing proficiency. Variable semesters. Zurawik.

COM 234. Critical Analysis of Journalism (3 Cr.) (GEN. ED. #9)
Examination of the economic, political, social, and psychological forces that have created the cultural context in which journalists operate nationally and internationally. Both the process (journalistic routines and institutional influences) and the products (broadcast and print news stories) are examined critically. Prerequisites: COM 105, COM 132, college writing proficiency, and sophomore standing; or permission of the instructor. Fall or spring semester. Burton, Zurawik.

COM 237. Media Criticism (3 Cr.) (GEN. ED. #9 and #10) (LER – TXT)
This course examines the critical and theoretical approaches to understanding the televisual world. From formalist to feminist and postmodernist theory, students gain an in-depth understanding of the codes and conventions that govern the cultural production of television. Ideological, genre-based, auteurist, and other approaches are examined. Prerequisites: COM 105, COM 132, college writing proficiency, and sophomore standing; or permission of the instructor. Fall semester. Burton, Zurawik, Marcus.

COM 239. Film Theory and History I (4 Cr.) (GEN. ED. #4 and #9) (LER–TXT)
This course will examine the history of and theories about film as an art form, a technology, a business, and a cultural practice with sociopolitical meaning and impact. Emphasis on narrative, dramatic film from the inception of the film industry to 1950. Prerequisites: COM 105, COM 132, college writing proficiency, and sophomore standing; or permission of instructor. Fall semester. Peroutka, Turner.

COM 245. Film Theory and History II (4 Cr.) (GEN. ED. #4 and #9) (LER–TXT)
This course will examine the history of and theories about film as an art form, a technology, a business, and a cultural practice with sociopolitical meaning and impact. Emphasis on narrative, dramatic film from the 1940s through the 2000s. Prerequisites: COM 105, COM 132, college writing proficiency, and sophomore standing; or permission of instructor. Spring semester. Turner, Peroutka.

COM 257. Intercultural Communication (4 Cr.) (GEN. ED. #9 and #10) (LER–DIV)
A survey of communication issues and problems created by sociocultural, racial, and national differences. This course focuses on analyzing communication processes between peoples and nations, including interactions among the uses of media technologies, government policies, economic interests, past patterns, and future trends in national and international communications. Prerequisites: COM 105, COM 132, college writing proficiency, and sophomore standing; or permission of the instructor. Spring semester. Burton.

COM 262. Research Methods in Communication Studies (3 Cr.) (GEN. ED. #7)
An investigation of the theory and methodological approaches to academic research in the field of communication studies. Emphasizing qualitative approaches, this course covers ethnography, interviewing, survey methods, focus group work, textual analysis, content analysis, historical analysis, reception theory, and so forth. The course will focus on application of these methods to conduct research for through numerous student projects. Intensive writing required. Must be taken to achieve writing proficiency in the major. Prerequisites: COM 105 and certified college writing proficiency or permission of instructor. Students that fail to obtain writing proficiency in the major will be dropped from the major. Fall semester, repeated spring semester. Kimball, Zurawik.

COM 272G. Intensive Course Abroad (4 Cr.) (LER-SA)
INTENSIVE COURSE ABROAD: Film in Berlin (4 Cr.)(GEN. ED. #3) This course will take students “on location” to Berlin. It will not only provide an overview of Berlin as a historic and modern city of film, but will also explore significant aspects of the contemporary film industry at the sites in Berlin. Students will discuss and write about Berlin film. They will also have opportunities to meet with representatives of film production and marketing companies, film schools, film festivals, and the Film Commissions. Prerequisite: GER 129 or permission of instructor. Summer. Larkey. INTENSIVE COURSE ABROAD: ALTERNATIVE MEDIA AND CULTURE IN THE BALKANS (3) (GEN. ED. #3) This course provides an international field experience in the arts, culture, and social activism in the recently-independent nations of the former Yugoslavia. The program will be centered in Bosnia, and the cultural projects that have challenged political, social, and aesthetic conventions. Students will meet internet activists, filmmakers, event organizers, and others exploring innovative approaches to media. The course will explore the dynamics of alternative media and cultural production. Summer. Alternate years. Marcus, Burns.

COM 272PO. Intensive Course Abroad: Alternative Media and Culture in the Balkans: Post-Course (2 Cr.) 
This course centers on the creation of an artistic and cultural exhibition and festival curated by the students who have taken the Intensive Course Abroad, Alternative Media and Culture in the Balkans. Students will organize the exhibition, provide supporting informational materials, and publicize it. Fall, every other year. First offered 2013. Burns

COM 272PP. Intensive Course Abroad: Alternative Media and Culture in the Balkans (2-3 Cr.) 
This course provides an international field experience in the arts, culture, and social activism in the recently-independent nations of the former Yugoslavia. The program will be centered in Bosnia, and the cultural projects that have challenged political, social, and aesthetic conventions. Students will meet internet activists, filmmakers, event organizers, and others exploring innovative approaches to the media. The course will explore the dynamics of alternative media and cultural production. Summer, alternate years. Burns, Marcus.

COM 272PR. Intensive Course Abroad: Alternative Media and Culture in the Balkans: Pre-Course (2 Cr.) 
This seven-week course prepares students for the Intensive Course Abroad, Alternative Media and Culture in the Balkans. The course covers the history of the region, its cultural influences, and the role the arts and alternative media have played in the Yugoslav and post-Yugoslav eras. The course is a pre-requisite for the ICA for all students not studying abroad in the semester before the ICA. Semester. Burns, Marcus.

COM 286. Field Video Production (4 Cr.) (GEN. ED. #8)
Introduction to the theory, technology, and practice of field video production. The basic language of location production lighting, visual aesthetics, and sound recording is taught. Students work both together and independently to produce a range of programming, from commercials to documentaries to experimental video. Prerequisite: one 100-level course in communication or sophomore standing. Fall semester. Raymond (focus: news and commercial practices), Marcus, Hudson (focus: narrative and non-commercial practices).

COM 290. Internship in Communication (3-4 Cr.) 
Internships based on previous course work in the department are available in television, video, radio, motion pictures, sound recording, print and electronic journalism, photography, advertising, public relations, media archival work, arts administration, political media, or studies in popular culture. Prerequisites: at least 9 credits in the Communication Department, advanced sophomore standing, and permission of the director. Graded pass/no pass only. Variable semesters. Burton, Kimball, Marcus, Peroutka, Zurawick.

COM 299. Applied Video Production (1-4 Cr.) 
Qualified students may earn one to four credits per semester for participation in the communication and media department video productions, the campus television station, or independent work in video. Students will be required to work 30 hours per credit earned. Prerequisites: sophomore, junior, or senior standing; at least one video production course; and permission of the television studio administrator. A maximum of eight credits may be taken in applied video. Graded pass/no pass only. Fall semester, repeated spring semester. Marcus, Raymond.

COM 301. Topics in Media and Communication (3-4 Cr.) 
An intensive study of a specific issue or issues in one of the major research traditions in the field. Concentration on a topic of current debate in communication studies, often across media formats. The specific topic for the class is posted before registration. Examples of topics include Alternative Media; Race and Ethnicity in Film and Television; and Advanced Readings in Popular Culture. Prerequisites: at least two of the 200-level required theory/criticism and history courses, departmental and college writing proficiency, and junior or senior status; or permission of the instructor. Repeatable if topic is different. Variable semesters. Burton, Kimball, Marcus, Peroutka, Zurawik.

COM 307. Special Topics in World Cinema (4 Cr.) 
Advanced study in a particular movement, period, aspect, country, or continent within the motion picture's industrial, sociocultural, and aesthetic development worldwide. Topics for a given semester are posted before registration. Examples of topics include African-American Film, Film Noir, and War and the Cinema. Prerequisites: COM 239 and/or COM 245, departmental and college writing proficiency, junior or senior status; or permission of the instructor. Repeatable if the topic is different. Variable semesters. Burton, Kimball, Peroutka.

COM 312. Issues in Broadcasting and the Electronic Media (3 Cr.) 
Analysis of selected topics in television, radio, and the new electronic media, or development of skill in a particular format. The specific topic is posted before registration. Examples include: Advanced Audio Production; Broadcast News Writing; Children and Television; and Producing and Writing for the Internet. Prerequisites: completion of two of the 200 level required theory/criticism and history courses, departmental and college writing proficiency, junior or senior status, or permission of the instructor. Repeatable if topic is different. Fall semester, repeated spring semester. Hudson, Marcus, Peroutka, Raymond, Taylor, Zurawik.

COM 315. Screenwriting (3 Cr.) (GEN. ED. #8)
Critical analysis and practice of writing dramatic material for film and television. Students will craft a complete script, from premise to polished dialogue. Students will also examine the art of screen and television writing from a critical perspective, reading and researching literature in the field. Prerequisites: certified college writing proficiency, COM 132, and sophomore standing or permission of instructor. Spring semester.Peroutka, Marcus.

COM 317. The Documentary Tradition (4 Cr.) 
An in-depth investigation of the history and theory of the documentary tradition in film and television. Examining both American and international examples, this course looks at major schools, movements, goals, and styles of documentary production. Representative texts are studied for their sociopolitical influences, persuasive techniques, and aesthetic formulas. Prerequisites: two of the required 200-level theory/criticism and history courses; departmental and college writing proficiency; junior or senior status; or permission of the instructor. Fall semester. Offered alternate years. Marcus, Peroutka.

COM 325. Women and Film (4 Cr.) 
This course will examine the relationship between women and the film industry, from the days of silent film to the 21st century. We will look at the roles women have played, both in front of and behind the camera-from the female star of the classical Hollywood "woman's" film of the 1930's-1940's, and the iconic stereotypes that have pervaded Hollywood gendered discourse, to the re-emergent role of women as directors, screenwriters, and producers in contemporary Hollywood and world cinemas. Interrogating the role of women as icons, producers, and consumers, we will try to understand where we came from and how we got to the here and now. Hollywood, independent, and international film will be examined. Prerequisites: COM 239 and/or 245, or WS 230; departmental and college writing proficiency; junior or senior status; or permission of the instructor. Repeatable if the topic is different. Variable semesters: Peroutka, Burton.

COM 333. Media Ethics (3 Cr.) 
Examination of the key ethical concepts and theories for the purpose of considering the moral implications of contemporary media practice. Strategies of ethical analysis applied to specific communication problems within international and global contexts. Using the case-study approach, this course explores a variety of issues, including image ethics and war, terrorism and the media, and First World representations of the Third World. Prerequisites: at least two 200-level required theory/criticism and history courses, departmental and college writing proficiency, and junior or senior status; or permission of the instructor. Offered alternate years. Zurawik.

COM 335. International Mass Media (3 Cr.) 
A comparative survey of the structure, regulation, economics, programming, and politics of mass media systems in First, Second, and developing countries. Questions of international information flow, cultural imperialism, development communications, and international governance are addressed. The relationship between democracy and media systems provide a policy-oriented framework for readings and discussions. Prerequisites: at least two of the 200-level required theory/criticism and history courses or two 200-level political science courses, departmental and college writing proficiency, and junior or senior status; or permission of the instructor. Spring semester. Offered alternate years. Peroutka, Ungar.

COM 340. Media, Politics, and Civic Engagement (3 Cr.) 
This course focuses on the ways in which citizens develop knowledge of, engage with, and practice politics through mass media and personal media forms in contemporary American society. Students examine historical and contemporary practices of civic engagement and political organizing via media such as the mainstream media, alternative press, talk radio, the Internet, cinematic representations, and others. Students develop an understanding of the power available to citizens for political engagement in the world via mediated communication forms. Prerequisites: at least two of the required 200-level theory/criticism and history courses or two 200-level political science courses, departmental and college writing proficiency, and junior or senior status; or permission of instructor. Fall semester. Offered alternate years. Marcus.

COM 360. Advanced Video Production (4 Cr.) 
Production in selected formats, emphasizing larger-scale works by students individually or in groups. Advanced instruction in preproduction, writing, camera, lighting, sound, editing, and working with subjects and performers. Specific focuses may include documentary and feature field production, group documentary, live studio performance, and studio serial drama. Prerequisites: COM 189 and COM 286 and junior or senior status; or permission of instructor. Repeatable if format is different. Spring semester. Hudson, Marcus, Raymond.

COM 393. Independent Work in Advanced Production (3 Cr.) 
Semester-long project in video, audio or multimedia production or writing. To qualify, the student must be in good academic standing and have achieved an overall GPA of at least 3.0, have successfully completed at least two production courses, including one at the 300-level, and have the permission of a faculty adviser. The student should have an approved production proposal before registration. First offered 2013-14. Burton, Marcus, Raymond.

COM 400. Independent Study (2-4 Cr.) 
Independent study of the student's choice. To qualify for an independent study the student must be in good academic standing and have achieved an overall GPA of at least 3.5, have acquired both college and departmental writing proficiency, be a junior or a senior, have completed the 200-level theory requirement, and have the permission of a faculty adviser and an approved proposal that includes a substantial statement of intent and a preliminary bibliography of sources to be consulted. Variable semesters. Burton, Kimball, Marcus, Peroutka, Zurawik.