COG 110. INTRODUCTION TO COGNITIVE SCIENCE (4) (GEN. ED. #6)
This course focuses on the study of knowledge and cognition from multiple perspectives: psychology, computer science, philosophy, neurosciences, and the humanities. Topics include the mind-brain dichotomy, thought as computation, artificial intelligence, methods in cognitive science, and the philosophy of mind. Three hours lecture, three-hour laboratory.
Fall semester. Seltzer.

COG 223. TWENTIETH-CENTURY ANALYTIC PHILOSOPHY (3) (PHL 223)
This course will focus on philosophers' efforts to provide satisfactory accounts of the nature of the mind, its relationship to that of the body, and consciousness. Among the accounts we will study are materialism, logical behaviorism, the identity theory, functionalism, intentionality, and phenomenalism. Prerequisite: either sophomore standing, a 100-level philosophy course, or permission of the instructor.
Fall semester. Offered 2010-11 and alternate years. Welch.

COG 275. EPISTEMOLOGY (3) (PHL 275) (GEN. ED. #7)
This course will examine the theories of truth, such as the correspondence and coherence theories, and the related theories of belief that support these claims to knowledge. We will also examine the criteria for what constitutes appropriate evidence for a knowledge claim. The course will conclude with the more recent problems proposed for the traditional definition of knowledge and some attempts to overcome these problems. Prerequisite: either sophomore standing, a 100-level philosophy course, or permission of the instructor.
Fall semester. Offered 2009-10 and alternate years. Welch.

COG 290. INTERNSHIP IN COGNITIVE STUDIES (3-4)
Students interested in the application of cognitive studies in government, business, and industry may elect a placement in various organizations to apply their learning. May be taken for either a letter grade or pass/no pass. Prerequisites: junior standing and minor in cognitive studies.
Department.

COG 299/399. INDEPENDENT WORK IN COGNITIVE STUDIES (3-4)
Special topics based on previous course work in the minor and selected in conference with the instructor.
Fall semester, repeated spring semester. Department.

COG 376. SEMINAR IN COGNITIVE STUDIES (PSY 376)
This seminar focuses on some aspect of thought, language, memory, perception, consciousness, psychopharmacology, or behavior considered from the perspective of cognitive psychology and at least one other discipline (linguistics, philosophy, neuroscience, and computer science). May be repeated for credit with different topics. Prerequisites: PSY 202, 235, or 237 (depending on the topic) and PSY 252 or 255, or permission of instructor.
Spring semester. KleyKamp.

Supplementary Courses

CS 230. ANALYSIS OF COMPUTER ALGORITHMS (4)
The design of computer algorithms and techniques for analyzing the efficiency and complexity of algorithms. Emphasis on sorting, searching, and graph algorithms. Several general methods of constructing algorithms, such as backtracking and dynamic programming, will be discussed and applications given. Prerequisites: CS 119.
Fall semester. Offered 2012-13 and alternate years. Zimmerman.

CS 250. THEORY OF COMPUTATION (4)
The basic theoretical principles embodied in formal languages, automata, and computability. Topics include finite automata, nondeterministic machines, regular expressions, context-free grammars, Turing machines, Church's thesis, the halting problem, unsolvability, and computational complexity. Prerequisites: CS 119.
Spring semester. Offered 2012-13 and alternate years. Zimmerman.

CS 340. PRINCIPLES OF ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE (3) (GEN. ED. #7)
An introduction to the field of artificial intelligence, including its tools, techniques, and issues. An overview of search methods, symbolic manipulation, pattern matching, vision, machine learning, expert systems, and robotics. Prerequisite: CS 119 and junior standing.
Fall semester. Offered 2011-12 and alternate years. Zimmerman.

ENG 219. LINGUISTICS (3)
An introduction to modern linguistics, with special attention to grammatical structures, word and sound formation, and semantics. The course also explores recent linguistic theories, as well as the history of the English language. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.
Spring semester. Offered 2011-12 and alternate years. Garrett.

PHL 215. PHILOSOPHY AND SCIENCE (3)
An analysis of how both philosophers and scientists understand the practice of scientific investigation. In particular, the concept of causality will be examined to highlight the modern period's radical reconfiguration of what it means to possess knowledge, as well as to address the social and political ramifications of these changes. Prerequisite: either sophomore standing, a 100-level philosophy course, or permission of the instructor.
Spring semester. Offered 2009-10 and alternate years. DeCaroli.

PSY 237. PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)
Investigates physiological and neurological basis of behavior; considers receptor, central, and effector structures; the organization of behavior as it relates to action of the nervous system. Focus is placed on biological contributions to mental and neurological disorders. Prerequisite: PSY 111.
Spring semester. Seltzer.

PSY 380. SEMINAR IN COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY (3)
A detailed examination of one or more selected topic(s) in cognitive psychology. Emphasis on critical evaluation of assumptions and methodologies for scientific study of the mind. Topics are selected from representation of knowledge, problem solving, psycholinguistics, reading, language comprehension, and case studies in cognitive processes. May be repeated for credit with different topics. Prerequisites: PSY 202 or 235, and 252 or 255, or permission of the instructor.
Fall semester. McCabe.

Critical Theory/Methodology Courses

ENG 221. THEORIES OF COMPOSING, TUTORING, AND TEACHING (3)
Designed for students who are recommended as potential Writing Center tutors, students who are interested in teaching careers, and students in the cognitive studies and theory, culture, and interpretation concentrations. Study of current theory and research on how writers write and what teaching methods are most effective. Discussion of collaborative learning, error analysis, writing styles, and tutoring strategies. One hour a week peer tutoring in Writing Center required. Prerequisites: college writing proficiency, the instructor's permission based on a recommendation by a Goucher College faculty member and instructor's review of college transcript, a writing sample, and an interview.
Fall semester. Sanders.

ENG 392. CONTEMPORARY LITERARY THEORY (3)
An introduction to Postcolonial Theory, which is one branch of literary theory, this course deals with international contexts and the power differences between the western world and its former colonies. We study works by Said, Fanon, Bhabha and Spivak. Though this counts as a literature seminar for students in the English major, we do not emphasize the study of literature, but rather ideas about what "postcoloniality" means and what its implications are. The texts we read are, admittedly, challenging, but are provocative and exciting too. This course will hopefully expand your own ideas about race, gender, nationalism and the effects of political and cultural influence. Prerequisite: ENG 215.
Spring semester. Alternate years. Rauwerda.

MA 140. INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS (FORMERLY MA 105) (4) (GEN. ED. #5) (LER-MR)
Basic concepts of descriptive statistics, simple probability distributions, prediction of population parameters from samples. Problems chosen from the natural and social sciences. Use of the computer in the analysis and interpretation of statistical data. Four hours lecture. Prerequisite: placement exam. Credit will not be given for those who have received credit for MA 141.
Fall semester, repeated spring semester. Webster.

MA 240. PROBABILITY (3) (GEN. ED. #5)
Probability in sample spaces, discrete and continuous random variables, special distributions, expected value and variance, and Central Limit Theorem. Three hours lecture. Prerequisite: MA 180.
Fall semester. Offered 2012-13 and alternate years. Faculty.

PHL 280. ARCHAEOLOGY OF LANGUAGE (3) (GEN. ED. #10)
A discussion of language in its various roles, from creating meaning to hiding it. By looking at five ways of treating language-the literal, the metaphorical, the evocative, the structural, the deconstruction-this course explores why language works and why it sometimes does not work, why it is possible to be understood and to be misunderstood. Topics include the relationship of language and culture, language and gender, language and cognition, and language and madness. Readings in Aristotle, Heidegger, Barthes, Foucault, Derrida, and Eco. Prerequisite: either sophomore standing, a 100-level philosophy course, or permission of the instructor.
Fall semester. Offered 2011-12 and alternate years. Rose.

PSC 316. SEMINAR IN SCOPE AND METHOD IN POLITICAL SCIENCE (3)
What is politics and how should we study it? Review of competing views. Emphasis on some of the classics in the field. Prerequisite: PSC 101 and 102, and senior standing.
Spring semester. Department.

PSY 200. STATISTICAL METHODS IN PSYCHOLOGY (4) (GEN. ED. #5) (LER-MR)
An introduction to and critical examination of statistical and quantitative methods as applied in psychology and related fields. Exploratory, descriptive, and inferential concepts, techniques, and applications are considered including frequency distributions, measures of central tendency, variability and correlation, parameter estimation, and hypothesis testing (binomial tests, t-tests, analyses of variance, chi square, and selected non-parametric approaches). Statistical packages such as SPSS for Windows will be introduced and used throughout the course. Three hours lecture/discussion, 1.5 hours laboratory. Prerequisite: PSY 111 and at least sophomore standing. Open to majors in other departments with permission of the instructor.
Fall semester, repeated spring semester. Ghirardelli.

PSY 252. QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS IN PSYCHOLOGY (4)
This course will address the overall process of psychological research from the development of a research question to the presentation of research results. Topics to be covered include the role of theory in the scientific method, research design, various collection techniques and analytic strategies for quantitative empirical data, and ethical considerations. Students will develop skills in scientific writing (APA style) and critically reading and reviewing the literature. The course will require statistical analysis of research data and interpretation of the results. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory. Prerequisites: PSY 111 and 200.
Fall semester, repeated spring semester. Friedman-Wheeler and Choe.

SOC 210. DEVELOPMENT OF SOCIOLOGICAL THOUGHT (4)
This course introduces students to a wide range of classical and contemporary sociological theories, beginning with the study of theory in the historical context of its development. Examines the work of Marx,Weber, Simmel, Durkheim, Mead, and DuBois. Applies classical and contemporary social theory to current issues. Explores recent modifications to mainstream sociological theory, including critical theory and feminist critiques of the classical theorists' work. Required of all department majors and for writing proficiency in the major. Prerequisite: SOC 106 or ANT 107 or permission of the instructor.
Fall semester. Burton.