Biological Sciences | Chemistry

Biological Sciences

BIO 104. BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY I: KINGDOMS OF ORGANISMS (4) (GEN. ED. #6) (LER-NS)
An evolutionary approach is used to study the structure, function, and diversity of prokaryotes, protists, fungi, plants, and invertebrates. Laboratory work emphasizes experimentation and observation of living organisms in studies of functional morphology and adaptation. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory. BIO 104 is required for biology majors and highly recommended for students who will take additional courses in biology. Students considering electing BIO 104 to fulfill the general education requirement are encouraged to consult with an instructor or departmental chair.
Fall semester. Hiller, Kicklighter

BIO 104H. BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY I: HONORS COLLOQUIUM (1)
Once-a-week meetings to explore current issues and research relevant to BIO 104. Special presentations, discussions, and field trips. Prerequisite: admission by placement.
Fall semester. Kicklighter

BIO 210. CELL BIOLOGY AND BIOCHEMISTRY (3) (GEN. ED. #6 WITH BIO 214)
Study of the smallest unit of life focusing on the molecular characteristics of cell components that determine cell behavior. Topics include the composition and structure of the cell membrane, cytoplasm, and organelles in relation to transport, communication, metabolism, division, and locomotion. The models used to explain cell structure, function, and evolution are evaluated in terms of results from selected experiments. Three hours lecture, one hour discussion. Prerequisites: one college-level biology course and CHE 151 and 152 (or 152H).
Fall semester. Levin, Shambaugh

BIO 214. TECHNIQUES IN CELL BIOLOGY (1) (GEN. ED. #6 WITH BIO 210)
Students learn current technology and experimental procedures used for research in cell biology. Laboratory procedures include biochemical techniques in quantitative analysis, enzyme kinetics, protein purification, and cell fractionation, as well as traditional microscopic techniques in histology and histochemistry. Three hours laboratory. Prerequisite: BIO 210 or concurrent enrollment.
Fall semester. Shambaugh, Levin, Hodge

BIO 220. PRINCIPLES OF GENETICS (4) (GEN. ED. #6 WITH BIO 224)
Concepts of heredity and their application in a wide variety of organisms from bacteria to humans. Includes classical transmission genetics, chromosomal structure, DNA structure and replication, protein synthesis, gene regulation in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, extra-nuclear heredity, and introduction to molecular analysis of genes and chromosomes. Three hours lecture, one hour discussion. Prerequisites: BIO 210 (C- or better) and CHE 230.
Spring semester. Hiller

BIO 224. TECHNIQUES IN GENETICS AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (1) (GEN. ED. #6 WITH BIO 220)
Laboratory experience with techniques used in genetics and molecular biology research. These include the use of mutant strains to carry out genetic analyses such as genotypic and phenotypic characterizations, segregation analysis, and genetic mapping. Molecular techniques used to manipulate and analyze DNA are integrated with the genetics analysis and include the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction endonuclease digestion-site mapping. Prerequisite: BIO 210, 214, 220 or concurrent enrollment.
Spring semester. Andrews, Hiller

BIO 324. ADVANCED MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (3) (GEN. ED. #6 WITH BIO 324L AND GEN. ED. #7)
Topics include construction of recombinant DNA molecules; recombinant protein expression, purification and characterization; gene expression analyses; analysis of gene function, etc. The course also provides basic training in the use of bioinformatics tools to "mine" Web-based data on a variety of levels, from identification and characterization of individual genes or gene products, to examination of genome-wide responses, to integration genes or gene products, to examination of genome-wide responses, to integration of many different types of databases. Prerequisites: BIO 220 and 224.
Spring semester. Offered 2012-2013 and alternate years. Slocum 

BIO 324L. ADVANCED MOLECULAR BIOLOGY LAB (1) (GEN. ED. #6 WITH BIO 324)
The laboratory will provide the student with opportunities to investigate questions relating to basic biological processes and to design independent research projects that employ bioinformatics and advanced molecular biology techniques in an integrated manner. Prerequisites BIO 220 and BIO 224 and concurrent enrollment in BIO 324.
Spring semester. Offered 2012-2013 and alternate years. Slocum

BIO 327. ADVANCED GENETICS (3) (GEN.ED. #6 WITH BIO 328)
This course provides an understanding of the control and expression of genes at the molecular level with an emphasis on eukaryotic systems. Topics focus on genetic analyses of selected model systems, including Drosophila, S. cerevisiae, C. elegans, and human. Student participation and use of original literature are emphasized. Three hours lecture. Prerequisites: BIO 210 and 220.
Fall semester. Offered 2011-12 and alternate years. Hiller

BIO 328. ADVANCED GENETICS LABORATORY (1) (GEN. ED. #6 WITH BIO 327)
This laboratory focuses on the practical applications of molecular genetic techniques in the study of the regulation and expression of genes. Group experimental projects designed to allow the development of research techniques and analysis familiarize students with molecular and classical genetic methodologies in selected model genetic systems. Molecular techniques include cloning, gene mapping, restriction fragment analysis, Western and Northern blotting, in situ hybridization, microscopy, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Three hours laboratory. Prerequisites: BIO 224, 327 or concurrent enrollment.
Fall semester. Offered 2011-12 and alternate years. Hiller

BIO 333. PLANT PHYSIOLOGY (3) (GEN. ED. #11 AND GEN. ED. #11 WITH BIO 334)
Examination of factors influencing the growth and development of plants (water; mineral nutrients; hormones and chemical regulators; and environmental factors such as temperature, gravity, and light). Also included are biochemical and molecular aspects of important metabolic processes, such as photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation. Three hours lecture. Prerequisites: BIO 214 and 220.
Spring semester. Slocum

BIO 354. MICROBIOLOGY (3) (GEN. ED. #6 WITH BIO 354L)
An introduction to the structure, physiology, genetics, ecology, and the evolution ofmicroorganisms. Special attention is given to the role of microbes in industry and in infectious diseases. Chemotherapeutic and immune control of infectious diseases are also discussed in detail. Three hours lecture. Prerequisites: BIO 210, 220, 224 and CHE 230.
Fall semester. Kjellerup

BIO 362. ENDOCRINOLOGY (3) (GEN. ED. #6 WITH BIO 363)
A study of the vertebrate endocrine system. Topics include endocrine gland morphology, hormone syntheses and biochemistry, and hormonal regulation of physiological function with particular regard to growth, metabolism, reproduction, and electrolyte balance. Neuroendocrinology and mechanisms of hormone action are also considered in detail. Three hours lecture. Prerequisites: BIO 210, 224, and 260.
Spring semester. Offered 2012-13 and alternate years. Delahunty

BIO 374. SEMINAR IN MECHANISMS OF AGING AND CANCER (3) (GEN. ED. #7)
Investigation into the current understanding of biochemical processes that underlie progressive aging in humans. Topics include the evolution of senescence, the genetic and environmental components of aging-related diseases such as Alzheimer's and cancer, and the implications of current research that is aimed at improving the quality and longevity of human life. Lectures, discussions, and student presentations. Prerequisite: BIO 210 and 220 or CHE 341.
Spring semester. Offered 2012-13 and alternate years. Levin

BIO 378. DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY (3) (GEN. ED. #6 WITH BIO 378L)
The developmental sequence of events that leads to the formation of an embryo is described using selected animal systems. Theories on the underlying mechanisms of the processes that create controlled growth, specified form, and cell specialization are evaluated using experimental evidence. Three hours lecture. Prerequisites: BIO 210, 220, and 224. Co-requisite: BIO 378L.
Spring semester. Shambaugh

BIO 382. SEMINAR IN GENETICS AND HUMAN DISEASE (3) (GEN. ED. #7)
The seminar will examine cell signaling pathways that function during animal development and are implicated in cancer and other human diseases. Classical and molecular genetic analysis of human disease and model genetic systems will be emphasized. Attention will focus on how the study of human disease can shed light on basic biological function. Primary literature, discussions and student presentations. Prerequisite: BIO 220 and 224.
Fall semester. Offered 2012-13 and alternate years. Hiller

BIO 387. SEMINAR IN PLANT MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY (3) (GEN. ED. #7)
Seminar focuses on use of molecular biology techniques to understand plant growth and development, to improve agriculturally important plants, to modify plant metabolism for production of pharmaceuticals, etc. Emphasis on primary scientific literature. Lecture, discussions, student presentations. Prerequisites: BIO 210 and 220.
Fall semester. Offered 2013-14 and alternate years. Slocum

BIO 390Y-399Y. RESEARCH IN BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES (2/2)
A special opportunity for advanced students to pursue their own research topic. Students considering graduate studies should explore this possibility with a departmental faculty sponsor. Under the guidance of the faculty sponsor, the student designs laboratory or field research for one or two semesters. The research may take place on campus or at an off-campus laboratory. Results of the research will be submitted in a format suitable for publication in a research journal in the field of study. Independent research and oral presentation of research findings in a departmental seminar are required for graduation with honors in the major. Students may earn up to four credits per year. Prerequisites: permission of the instructor and approval of the department. Forfurther details, consult the Information Handbook for the Major in the Biological Sciences.
Fall semester, repeated spring semester; summer. Department

  • BIO 390Y. Research in Animal Physiology
  • BIO 391Y. Research in Cell Biology
  • BIO 392Y. Research in Developmental Biology
  • BIO 393Y. Research in Ecology
  • BIO 394Y. Research in Endocrinology
  • BIO 395Y. Research in Environmental Physiology
  • BIO 396Y. Research in Microbiology
  • BIO 397Y. Research in Molecular Biology
  • BIO 398Y. Research in Genetics
  • BIO 399Y. Research in Plant Biology

Chemistry

CHE 111. PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY I (3) (GEN. ED. #6 WITH CHE 112 OR 112H) (LER-NS WITH CHE 112)
Structure and properties of atoms and molecules and the states of matter, relationship of electronic structure to the properties of elements and simple compounds, properties of solutions, acid-base and redox reactions in solution. Prerequisite: A score of M on the mathematics placement exam. Corequisite: CHE 112 (or 112H). Three hours lecture and 90-minute workshop.
Fall semester. Gibbs.

CHE 112. PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY I: LABORATORY (1) (GEN. ED. #6 WITH CHE 111) (LER-NS WITH CHE 111)
Experiments that illustrate topics covered in CHE 111. Corequisite: CHE 111. Three hours lab.
Fall semester. Douglass, Sibley.

CHE 112H. CHEMICAL PRINCIPLES: HONORS LABORATORY (2) (GEN. ED. #6 WITH CHE 111)
Synthesis of inorganic compounds followed by experiments to elucidate their chemical structure and solution behavior. Development of laboratory techniques and experience with modern instrumental methods. One hour lecture, three hours laboratory. Placement by department only. Corequisite: CHE 111.
Fall semester. Gibbs.

CHE 151. PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY II: LECTURE (3)
The theory of chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, aspects of solution equilibria, including solubility, acid-base reactions, redox reactions, and complex formation. The application of these theories to gravimetric and volumetric analysis. Prerequisites: CHE 111 and 112 (or 112H) or permission of the instructor. Corequisite: CHE 152 (or 152H). Three hours lecture and 90-minute workshop.
Spring semester. Gibbs.

CHE 152. PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY II: LABORATORY (1)
A laboratory experience demonstrating the principles and applications of the theories discussed in CHE 151. Three hours laboratory Prerequisites: CHE 111 and 112 (or 112H). Corequisite: CHE 151.
Spring semester. Douglass, Sibley

CHE 152H. PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY II: HONORS LABORATORY (2)
Continuation of experiments in CHE 112H, including those that illustrate the topics covered in CHE 151. A multi-week independent project is also completed. One hour lecture, three hours laboratory. Placement by department only. Corequisite: CHE 151 or permission of the instructor.
Spring semester. Gibbs.

CHE 230. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I (4)
Chemistry of the compounds of carbon with emphasis on the relation of molecular structure to chemical and physical behavior. Laboratory work includes appropriate techniques and synthetic and analytical methods. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory. Prerequisites: CHE 151 and 152 (or 152H) with grades of C- or better.
Fall semester. Ahmed-Schofield, Greco, Schultz.

CHE 235. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II (4)
Continuation of CHE 230. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory. Prerequisite: CHE 230 with a grade of C- or better.
Spring semester. Greco, Schultz, Ahmed-Schofield.

CHE 240. BIOPHYSICAL CHEMISTRY (3)
Exploration of the states of matter and laws of thermodynamics applied to chemical systems and rates of reactions. Emphasis will be placed on the physical chemistry of biological systems and the theoretical basis for various biophysical techniques. Prerequisites: MA 180 and PHY 115 or 125 , BIO 210 , CHE 151 andCHE 152 (or 152H).
Spring semester. Offered 2014-15 and alternate years. Sibley, Amman.

CHE 266. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY FUNDAMENTALS II (3)
States of matter, laws of thermodynamics applied to chemical systems, rates of reactions. Three hours lecture. Prerequisites: CHE 151 and 152 (or 152H), PHY 115/115L (or 125), and MA 180.
Spring semester. Douglass.

CHE 330. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY III (3) (GEN. ED. #7)
Topics in advanced organic chemistry: advanced synthesis, electrocyclic reactions, reaction mechanisms, structural effects, advanced stereochemistry. Three hours lecture. Prerequisite: CHE 235.
Fall semester. Offered 2011-2012 and alternate years. Schultz.

CHE 341. BIOCHEMISTRY I (3)
Structure and function of biological molecules, chemistry of enzyme-catalyzed reactions, intermediary metabolism. Three hours lecture. Prerequisites: CHE 235 and one college-level general biology course, or permission of the instructor.
Fall semester. Levin.

CHE 342. TECHNIQUES IN BIOCHEMISTRY (2)
Introduction to the basic techniques for studying the structure and function of biological molecules. One hour lecture, three hours laboratory. Pre- or corequisite: CHE 341.
Fall semester. Levin, Greco.

CHE 345. BIOCHEMISTRY OF GENE EXPRESSION (3)
Chemical and physical properties of nucleic acids; mechanisms of DNA replication, recombination, and repair; biochemistry of transcription, processing, and translation of genetic information. Emphasis on experimental basis for current knowledge and ongoing areas of research. Three hours lecture. Prerequisite: CHE 341 or the combination of CHE 235 and BIO 220 or permission of the instructor.
Spring semester. Levin.

CHE 346. TECHNIQUES IN BIOCHEMISTRY II: LABORATORY (2)
Techniques in purification and physical and chemical analysis of nucleic acids. One hour lecture, three hours laboratory. Pre- or corequisite: CHE 345.
Spring semester. Levin.

CHE 355. MODERN METHODS OF CHEMICAL ANALYSIS (3)
Powerful methods have developed in recent years for analyzing and separating mixtures and for determining molecular structure. A survey of these methods with emphasis on the design, application, and basic chemical principles involved in using these techniques. Comparison of methods with regard to type of data obtainable, sensitivity, selectivity, and cost. Three hours lecture. Prerequisites: CHE 230 with PHY 116/116L or 126 as a pre- or corequisite.
Spring semester. Department.

CHE 372. INORGANIC CHEMISTRY (3)
Relationship between electronic and molecular structure and the properties of the elements and of inorganic compounds and organometallic compounds. Application of spectroscopic, thermodynamic, and kinetic studies to elucidate the mechanisms and reactions of inorganic and organometallic substances. Three hours lecture. Prerequisites: CHE 230 and 265.
Spring semester. Offered 2012-2013 and alternate years. Department.

CHE 380. MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY (3)
An interdisciplinary capstone course about the chemistry of drugs. Topics include therapeutic targets of pharmaceuticals, the drug discovery process including quantitative structure-activity relationships, the fate of a drug in the body from administration to removal, and the detailed mechanism of action of selected drugs. Prerequisites: CHE 235 and either BIO 210 or CHE 341.
Spring semester. Offered 2011-2012 and alternate years. Greco.

CHE 391H. SEMINAR IN CHEMISTRY, HONORS (2-3)
Seminar courses are offered to extend knowledge in an area of chemistry of student interest through assigned readings from the current literature, problem sets, and/or requiring considerable student independence. Topics are determined by student interest and needs. Sample topics include: Introduction to Materials Science (Sibley/physics), Chemical Applications of Group Theory (Gibbs), Bioinorganic Chemistry (Gibbs), Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (Greco), and Descriptive Chemistry (Gibbs). Oral presentation(s) and, in some cases, a formal written report are required. CHE 391H is a full-semester course. Prerequisites: CHE 235 and permission of the department; additional courses as appropriate for the particular seminar topic will be specified by the department.
Fall semester, repeated spring semester. Department.

CHE 392H/393H. SEMINAR IN CHEMISTRY, HONORS (1.5)
See description in CHE 391H. CHE 392 is the first seven weeks. CHE 393H is the second seven weeks. Prerequisites: CHE 235 and permission of the department; additional courses as appropriate for the topic will be specified by the department.
Fall semester, repeated spring semester. Department.

CHE 395Y. INDEPENDENT WORK IN CHEMISTRY (2-4) (GEN. ED. #6 AND #7)
Independent laboratory project and associated library work carried out under the supervision of a member of the department. A formal written report, electronic portfolio, and presentation of research findings in a departmental seminar and attendance at designated campus events and seminars are required. May be repeated. A minimum of 4 credits of CHE 395Y, ordinarily spread over two semesters, is required for the ACS-certified degree. Prerequisites: senior standing as a chemistry major, minimum GPA of 3.0 in courses required for the chemistry major, and permission of the department.
Fall semester, repeated spring semester. Department.