Studio Art

ART 102 - Visual Thinking (4)
(GEN. ED. #8) (LER - ARC) Exploration of the basic materials, concepts, languages, and techniques of the two-dimensional visual arts. Topics include line, shape, value, color, texture, and space. Emphasis on creative exercises in and out of class. 
Fall semester, repeated spring semester. Abarbanel, Thompson, McConville.

ART 110 - Introduction to Relief Printmaking (4)
Introduction to the materials and methods of relief printmaking, including woodcut and linocut, with emphasis on understanding and using fundamental design concepts. Discussion of the history of relief printing techniques in the fine and applied arts. Guest artists, slide lectures. 
Fall semester, repeated spring semester. Department.

ART 114 - Drawing I: Introduction to Materials and Methods (4)
(GEN. ED. #8) (LER - ARC) Drawing from landscape, still life, and interiors, students learn fundamentals of composition, tone, texture, perspective, and three-dimensional form. The course employs a variety of drawing media. Emphasis on observation and organization. 
Fall semester, repeated in spring semester. Abarbanel, McConville.

ART 120 - Bookbinding and Artists' Books (4)
A hands-on course to learn basic bookbinding skills and techniques including Japanese, case, and library binding. Students will explore the rich field of artists' books, altered books, and journals, while examining the relationship between text, visual narrative and sequencing. Students will gain practical knowledge of paper, tools, and materials. Prerequisite: ART 102 or ART 127. 
Spring semester, variable years. Massey

ART 127 - Object, Meaning, Context: Fundamentals in 3-D (4)
(GEN. ED. #8) (LER - ARC) This course emphasizes fundamental ways of conceptualizing and constructing forms in space. We will investigate the underlying principles of three-dimensional design through guided problem solving that allows the exploration of a broad range of basic materials and builds a solid set of technical and constructive skills. Through hands-on studies, we examine the relationship between context and object, materials and subject, using the formal language of design to unlock the resolution of content. Museum visits, visiting artists, and slide/digital lectures. 
Fall semester, repeated in spring semester. Massey.

ART 140 - Drawing and Painting the Landscape (4)
The course provides an introduction to making images of the landscape. Taking advantage of the diverse environment surrounding Goucher's campus students will draw and paint urban, suburban, and rural landscapes. Beginning with basic drawing and painting skills, students will be exposed to the rich history of the subject including real, imaginary, and non-representational images. In addition, artists are expected to think critically about land use and environmental issues. The landscape itself is a text in which it is possible to read the natural and cultural history of a location. The ways we shape our environment reveal our priorities as a culture. 
Summer, offered 2011 and every 3 years. McConville.

ART 201 - Basic Photography (4)
(COM 202) (GEN. ED. #8) (LER - ARC) This course will introduce the basic concepts of camera vision and black and white photographic materials. The chief goal of the course is to provide you with technical skills and visual theory to produce photographs that reflect both your interests and your view of the world. You will learn to operate all the major controls of the film and digital camera, expose negatives accurately, and produce a range of black and white prints. Through lectures, demonstrations, readings, and discussions, you will be encouraged to pursue your own ideas and interest in response to assignments. This course is designed for students with previous experience and for beginners with no experience. Prerequisite: ART 102 or sophomore standing. Students must have their own 35mm film camera, some assignments give students the option to work with a digital camera. 
Fall semester, repeated spring semester. Worteck, Burns, department.

ART 203 - Intermediate Photography (4)
(COM 203) (GEN. ED. #8) This course extends and deepens the skills acquired in Basic Photography. You will broaden your understanding of film and digital exposure and printing controls, explore artificial light sources and flash, and experiment with films and papers. Projects are designed to engage with ideas about genres of photography while simultaneously increasing technical knowledge and skills. The course will include darkroom work, lectures, readings, and field trips. Students must have their own 35mm film camera. Prerequisite: ART 201 or COM 202. 
Fall semester, repeated spring semester. Worteck, Burns, department.

ART 204 - Digital Imaging I (3)
(GEN. ED. #8) (LER - ARC) An introduction to concepts concerning the principles, methods, techniques, and vocabulary of the most widely used digital imaging processes. Main focus will be on the application Adobe Photoshop® for various output methods. Emphasis on creativity, using the programs as a fine art tool, and achieving technical skill. Prerequisite: ART 102. 
Fall semester, repeated spring semester. Delaney.

ART 208 - Photography in Communication and Art (3)
(COM 208) Visual requirements in photography and graphics for art, advertising, journalism, public relations, and media (including documentaries) from still to websites. This course involves production, analysis decision making, and technology. Students will produce work in all these areas and develop an extended project on a theme they propose. Prerequisites: ART 201 and ART 203 or COM 202 and COM 203. 
Fall semester. Offered 2013-14 and alternate years. Worteck.

ART 209 - Photojournalism and Documentary Photography (3)
(COM 209) An examination of the development of photojournalism and the documentary essay. Lecture and slide presentations on the significant historical and critical developments in the field. The role of photography in propaganda and media manipulation, including a detailed investigation of the techniques and editorial practices that subvert the medium to reinforce various doctrines and ideologies. Included are a series of assignments that simulate editorial assignments that are then combined with lectures and demonstrations of techniques appropriate to this photographic genre. Students can use film or digital cameras. Students are required to write a proposal and execute a documentary/essay portfolio. Prerequisite: COM 209, COM 203, or permission of the instructor. 
Fall semester. Offered 2012-13 and alternate years. Worteck.

ART 213 - Life Drawing (4)
(GEN. ED. #8) Drawing from the model in a variety of media. Focus on anatomical, structural, and expressive elements of the human form. Prerequisite: ART 114 or permission of the instructor. 
Spring semester. Abarbanel, McConville.

ART 225 - Painting I: Introduction to Materials and Methods (4)
(GEN. ED. #8) (LER - ARC) Introduction to the materials and methods of oil painting with emphasis on perceptual painting. Preparation, composition, tone, color mixing, paint handling, using a variety of approaches. Prerequisite: ART 114 or permission of the instructor. 
Fall semester, repeated spring semester. Abarbanel, McConville.

ART 229 - Painting II (4)
This course presents students with a unique mixture of ideas and methods and takes advantage of Goucher's natural landscape. The goal of the course is to further develop skills and concepts studied in Painting I and will include landscape, still life, models, abstraction, and approaches not considered in Painting I. Prerequisite: ART 225. Students who have taken ART 229 previously may take this course at the 300 level: extra work will be assigned. 
Fall semester. Abarbanel, McConville

ART 230 - Sculpture I (4)
(GEN. ED. #8) Continuation and deepening of seeing, thinking, and working in three dimensions from ART 127. Referencing 30,000 years of makers, assignments include site-specific and time-based installation work. Studio work in a range of materials and processes, including welding, casting, modeling, and construction. Emphasis on idea generation, close observation, and development of editing and critical evaluation skills. Readings and slide presentations, museum, gallery, and artist studio visits. Prerequisite: ART 127. 
Fall semester. Massey.

ART 254 - Time-Based Art Practices and Theory (3)
An intensive course focusing on concepts, principles, methods, techniques, and vocabulary of time-based media in visual arts. This course includes readings, screenings, and discussions of historic and contemporary time-based media. Projects explore video, sound, animation, performance, and time-based installation artwork.
Spring semester. Offered 2015 and alternate years. Delaney.

ART 272G - Intensive Course Abroad: Sacred Space, the Forbidden Forest, and Nature's Place in Japan (3)
(GEN. ED. #3) Studying in Tokyo, Kyoto and the Wakayama prefecture, examining Shinto shrines and the belief in the living spirit of trees, mountains, water, the sun, and all things. These sacred spaces were built to honor the natural realms where the sprits live, and to invoke those spirits' presence. The persistence of perfection in craft and the conscious understanding of basic design principles are in evidence everywhere in Japan. Are Shinto beliefs regarding nature still honored? Do they play a role in everyday decisions about career paths, architectural design, or in the response to tragedy? Prerequisite: Sophomore standing, completion of 2 - 100 or 200 level art courses (studio or art history), and a GPA of 3.0. 
Summer 2012 and alternate years. Massey.

ART 290 - Internship in Art (3-4)
Internship opportunities can include work in public museums, commercial galleries, and auction houses; municipal, state, and federal arts foundations; individual assistantships with artists, alternative spaces, graphic studios, photographers, or filmmakers. Prerequisite: Submission of a detailed learning agreement approved by the faculty adviser agreeing to serve as the internship adviser. Junior or senior standing or three courses at the 200-level in the major recommended. May be taken pass/no pass or for a letter grade. 
Arranged by the student: summer break, winter break, or during the semester. Department.

ART 305-IW - Independent Work in Studio - Drawing (1.5-4)
Advanced studies in studio art. Prerequisites: ART 102 or ART 127 plus three studio courses (two of which should be in same medium as the independent work proposed) and a written contract with the faculty member willing to oversee the study. 
Fall semester, repeated spring semester. Department.

ART 306-IW - Independent Work in Studio - Painting (1.5-4)
Advanced studies in studio art. Prerequisites: ART 102 or ART 127 plus three studio courses (two of which should be in same medium as the independent work proposed) and a written contract with the faculty member willing to oversee the study. 
Fall semester, repeated spring semester. Department.

ART 307-IW - Independent Work in Studio - Photography (1.5-4)
Advanced studies in studio art. Prerequisites: ART 102 or ART 127 plus three studio courses (two of which should be in same medium as the independent work proposed) and a written contract with the faculty member willing to oversee the study. 
Fall semester, repeated spring semester. Department.

ART 308-IW - Independent Work in Studio - Sculpture (1.5-4)
Advanced studies in studio art. Prerequisites: ART 127 and Art 230 plus three studio courses (two of which should be in same medium as the independent work proposed) and a written contract with the faculty member willing to oversee the study. 
Fall semester, repeated spring semester. Massey.

ART 309-IW - Independent Work in Studio - Mixed-Media Installation (1.5-4)
Advanced studies in studio art. Prerequisites: ART 102 or ART 127 plus three studio courses (two of which should be in same medium as the independent work proposed) and a written contract with the faculty member willing to oversee the study. 
Fall semester, repeated spring semester. Department.

ART 310 - Introduction to Color Photography (4)
(GEN. ED. #8 and #9) This course, which is both creative and technical, is designed to introduce students to basic concepts in color photography. Students will execute a series of guided projects dealing with color and develop a personal project that uses color as a key expressive element. The course includes lectures and readings on historical and critical developments in color photography. Students must have their own digital SLR , digital point and shoot camera, or some other digital camera. Students will be expected to provide their own paper. Proficiency in black-and-white printing techniques is also required. Prerequisites: ART 201 and ART 203. 
Spring semester/variable years. Burns.

ART 311 - Studio Lighting (3)
This course offers instruction in setting up and using studio lighting safely and creatively. A range of assignments will offer techniques in photographing still-life objects, portraits, and manipulated imagery. Lighting techniques for both digital and film cameras. Prerequisites: ART 201, ART 203 , COM 201, COM 203.
Spring semester. Offered 2011-12 and alternate years. Worteck.

ART 312 - Digital Imaging II (3)
(GEN. ED. #8) This course offers an advanced exploration of Adobe Photoshop®, building on groundwork covered in Digital I. Allows students to work on more complex projects, further investigating their conceptual and technical capabilities. Prerequisite: ART 204. 
Spring semester Spring 2013, and alternate years. Delaney.

ART 329 - Painting II (4)
This course presents students with a unique mixture of ideas and methods and takes advantage of Goucher's natural landscape. The goal of the course is to further develop skills and concepts studied in Painting I and will include landscape, still life, models, abstraction, and approaches not considered in Painting I. Prerequisite: ART 225. Students who have taken ART 229 previously may take this course at the 300 level: extra work will be assigned. 
Fall semester. Abarbanel, McConville.

ART 330 - Influences and Ideas: Advanced Art Workshop (3)
An advanced course for art majors that examines important influences and issues that artists must explore to develop a mature style. The course will serve as an opportunity for students to synthesize and apply concepts encountered in the major and throughout the liberal arts curriculum. Students working in various media will join together in group critiques and develop work that includes mixed-media collaboration. Prerequisites: three studio art courses, two of which are in the same medium; junior or senior standing. May be repeated once for credit. 
Spring semester. Department.

ART 331 - Sculpture II (4)
(GEN. ED. #8 and #9) Studio work emphasizes the deepening development of personal vision begun in Sculpture I. Materials and processes to augment that goal are wide-ranging and driven by the needs of the student's research, but can include time-based work, video, sound, as well as welding, stone carving, use of materials such as fiberglass, rubber molds, found object, mixed mediums. Technical competence and craft serve aesthetic concerns and formal understanding. Visits to artists' studios, readings in current critical thought, slide lectures, exhibitions. Prerequisite: ART 230. Spring semester. 
Offered 2011-12 and alternate years. Massey.

ART 380 - Special Topics in Studio Art (4)
(GEN. ED. #8) A theme-based studio course will give advanced students an in-depth understanding of a particular topic in the studio arts. Techniques and ideas appropriate to the topic will be explored through assignments, readings, writings, and critiques. Students will be encouraged to develop their individual interpretation and understanding of the topic within the theoretical and conceptual framework of course discussion and studio work. This course is open to students concentrating in any area of studio art. Repeatable if topic is different. Prerequisite: two 200-level courses in studio art or permission of the instructor. 
Offered variable years. Department.

ART 398 - Advanced Studies in Studio Art (3-4)
Advanced individual work in the studio under the direction of a member of the department, accompanied by group meetings with other advanced students. Each student will design a specific project, execute it and complementary assignments, and participate in required critique sessions. Prerequisites: introductory, intermediate, and/or advanced courses in the selected medium and permission of the instructor. 
Offered variable years. Department.

Art History

ART 103 - Introduction to the History of Art (4)
(GEN. ED. #4 and #9) (LER - TXT) Introduces the study of Western art and the discipline of art history, its methods, terminology, and critical issues, including the problems of the canon, aesthetics, chronology, and periodization. Students will explore images and objects produced at different moments and in a variety of geographic and cultural contents, considering throughout the ways in which art conveys meaning through visual form, the ebb and flow of various stylistic trends, the use of symbolic images in the sacred and secular realms, the persistence of major visual motifs, the role of the spectator in shaping the meaning the meaning of images and objects, and the influence of political and economic conditions on the making of art. 
Fall and spring semesters. Husch, Oettinger.

ART 207 - Philosophy and Art (3)
(PHL 212) (GEN. ED. #9) An analysis of the philosophical implications and cultural significance of art during the modern period. In pursuing an answer to the question "What is art?" we will examine a selection of philosophical writings on the subject, each of which tries to determine what characteristics make art objects different from all others. In addition, we will examine the political, social, racial, and historical factors that helped produce the institutions, economies, and values that, in the West at least, sustain the notion of "fine art." Our investigation will include a critical consideration of such things as the modern museum, colonialism, the role of the art critic, and the art industry. This course cannot be used to fulfill a 200-level art history requirement for the art major. Prerequisite: sophomore standing, a 100-level philosophy course, or permission of instructor. 
Fall semester. Offered 2012-13 and alternate years. DeCaroli.

ART 244 - Collecting and History of the Museum (3)
(HIS 244) Examines premodern patterns of European arts patronage, collecting, and display that influenced the organization and form of the modern museum. Based on all of the innovations of early modern collectors, states organized national museums or sponsored the institutionalization of prominent private collections, which we examine through a number of case studies supported by visits to area museums. This course cannot be used to fulfill a 200-level art history requirement for the art major. 
Fall semester. Beachy.

ART 249 - History and Methods of Art History (3)
(GEN. ED. #7) (LER - TXT) This course explores the history of art history from its earliest writings to the formation of the contemporary discipline. Emphasis will be given to modes of interpreting the art object, including feminist, Marxist, and structuralist methodologies, as well as different forms of analysis, including stylistic, iconographic, and contextual. Students will also learn methods of scholarly research appropriate to the discipline, including finding, evaluating, analyzing, and synthesizing primary and secondary visual and textual sources. Prerequisites: ART 103 or permission of instructor. 
Fall semester. Oettinger.

ART 262 - Nature Into Art: The Cultural Dimensions of Landscape (3)
(GEN. ED. #9 and #11) (LER-ENV) This course explores the cultural dimensions of environmental sustainability, the complex relationship between humans and nature, and the historical roots of our ecological crisis through the lens of landscapes and gardenscapes in the visual arts over time and across cultures. Through landscape painting, gardens, and earthworks, we will address the 'legibility' and cultural construction of landscape imagery by exploring how artists have shaped, processed, and transformed nature, how humans have projected their identity, values, politics, and myths onto the land, and how visual constructions of landscapes shaped discussions and debates about the past, the present, and the future of the environment. Prerequisite: ART 103, sophomore standing, or permission of instructor. 
Spring semester. Offered 2012-13 and alternate years. Oettinger.

ART 266 - Medieval Art (3)
(GEN. ED. #4 and #9) European art from the catacombs to the cathedrals. Includes Early Christian, Carolingian, Romanesque, Gothic, and Byzantine art. Stylistic evolution and the ideas motivating style. A survey from Early Christian art through the High Gothic, including Byzantium. Prerequisite: ART 103 or permission of instructor. 
Spring semester. Offered 2011-2012 and alternate years. Oettinger.

ART 268 - Early Renaissance Art (3)
(GEN. ED. #4 and #9) nting, sculpture, and architecture alongside the 'minor' arts (woodwork, ceramics, glass, and the book arts) produced in Europe between the 13th and late-15th centuries, with special emphasis on how images by artist from Van Eyck to Leonardo functioned within their sacred, domestic, and civic settings. Prerequisite: ART 103 or permission of instructor. 
Spring semester. Offered 2011-12 and alternate years. Oettinger.

ART 272G - Intensive Course Abroad: Art, Memory, and Poetics of Place (4)
(GEN. ED. #3) An intensive course abroad in Rome and Prato, Italy. Students will embark on an a journey through Renaissance and Baroque Italy. As we visit the painting, sculpture, architecture, and urban environs of early modern Italy, we will consider the decoration and poetics-or making- of these spaces, with particular emphasis on how painters, sculptors, and architects embellished the environs around them to communicate a variety of messages and meanings. How do painting and sculpture interact with their physical contacts to render meaning? How did the visual arts of early modern Italy connect with their various audiences? The course will pair art history and studio components, so time will be spent studying sacred and domestic sites through lecture and through drawing and sketching on site. Prerequisites: ART 102, ART 103, ART 114, or ART 225.
Winter and summer semester. Variable. Massey, Oettinger.

ART 273 - High Renaissance (3)
(GEN. ED. #4 and #9) This course surveys painting, sculpture, and architecture in the age of Michelangelo, Durer, and Titian. In addition to exploring the artistic production of 16th-century Italy and Northern Europe in its cultural contexts, we will consider the emergence of the artist in the Early Modern era; the rise of art theory; the assimilation of antiquity in 16th-century art; and the development of portraiture, landscape, and mythology in 16th-century visual culture. Prerequisite: ART 103 or permission of instructor. 
Spring semester. Offered 2012-13 and alternate years. Oettinger.

ART 276 - Art of the Baroque (3)
(GEN. ED. #4 and #9) Art and architecture of 17th-century Europe in their social and political context. Art theory and practice. Major masters to be considered: Bernini, Caravaggio, Velázquez, Poussin, Rubens, Rembrandt, Vermeer. Prerequisite: ART 103 or permission of instructor. 
Fall semester. Offered 2011-12 and alternate years. Oettinger.

ART 277 - Rococo to Revolution: The Art of 18th-Century Europe ()
Art in the Age of Reason was more than a delicate continuation of the 17th-century Baroque. It encompassed a wide variety of approaches, including the elegant and sometimes-decadent rococo, the middle-class reaction this rococo produced, and the beginnings of a more sober neoclassicism. This course explores 18th-century European art and architecture in their social, political, and literary contexts from the late reign of Louis XIV to the French Revolution, including works from England, Germany, Italy, and France. Prerequisite: ART 103 or permission of instructor. 
Spring semester. Offered variable semesters. Oettinger.

ART 278 - European and American Architecture, 1750-1850 (3)
(HIS 278) (GEN. ED. #4 and #9) Introduction to architectural theory and practice in Europe and North America from the middle of the 18th through the middle of the 19th century. Neoclassicism, 19th-century revival and eclectic styles, new metal technologies. A brief overview of Colonial American architecture before 1750. Prerequisite: ART 103 or permission of instructor. 
Spring semester. Offered 2011-12 and alternate years. Husch.

ART 280 - Neoclassicism to Impressionism: European Art, 1780-1880 (3)
(GEN. ED. #4 and #9) European painting and sculpture in the age of industrial and political revolution. Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism, and Impressionism. Emphasis on the origins and development of a modern vision and its relationship to academic tradition and on the connection between the visual arts and European politics and society. Prerequisite: ART 103 or permission of instructor. 
Fall semester. Offered 2012-13 and subsequent years. Husch.

ART 281 - Modern Art, 1880-1914 (4)
(GEN. ED. #4 and #9) Painting and sculpture in Europe. Emphasis on the development and exploration of a modern vision in the late-19th and early-20th centuries. Post-Impressionism, Symbolism, Fauvism, Cubism, Abstraction, Dada, Surrealism. Prerequisite: ART 103 or permission of instructor. 
Spring semester. Husch.

ART 284 - Fine Art in America (3)
(GEN. ED. #4 and #9) Painting and sculpture produced in the United States, from the Colonial period to the Civil War, examined in the context of social and cultural developments. Consideration of the relationship of American art to European and non-Western traditions and exploration of the particularly American ideals and myths of national and artistic self-definition. Prerequisite: ART 103 or permission of instructor. 
Spring semester. Offered 2012-13 and alternate years. Husch.

ART 285 - History of Photography (3)
(COM 210) The history of photography from the earliest manifestations to the present. Prerequisite: ART 103 or permission of instructor. 
Fall semester. Worteck, Burns.

ART 286 - American Art Since World War II (3)
(GEN. ED. #9) Major movements and issues in American art from the end of World War ll through the 1970s. Emphasis on the function of the visual arts in contemporary society, the role of the artist, the nature of the creative process, varieties of meaning and content in works of art, and the relationship of art to the marketplace. Prerequisite: ART 103 or permission of instructor. 
Fall semester. Offered 2011-12 and alternate years. Husch.

ART 288 - Topics in the History of Non-Western Art (3)
A course devoted to a variety of changing topics in non-Western art history. May be repeated for credit with different topic. Prerequisite: ART 103 or permission of the instructor. 
Fall semester. Department.

ART 290 - Internship in Art Or Art History (3-4)
Internship opportunities include work in public museums, commercial galleries, and auction houses; municipal, state, and federal arts foundations; individual assistantships with artists, alternative spaces, graphic studios, photographers, or filmmakers. Prerequisite: Permission of department chair or art faculty advisor. Junior or senior standing recommended. Most internships require at least three courses at the intermediate level in the art major. May be taken pass/no pass. 
Department.

ART 347 - Seminar in Historic Preservation and Architecture (4)
(HP 320) Development of American architecture since 1880, including the influence of construction technology, building systems, materials, building codes, and construction financing on the design of buildings. The preservation and conservation of 20th-century materials and artifacts will also be addressed. Prerequisites: ART 278 or HP 110, HP 210, HP 220, HP 230, and ART 278/ HIS 278 or permission of the instructor. 
Variable semesters. Department.

ART 366 - The Art-Historical Presentation (1)
Directed study in which a student conceptualizes, researches, writes, and organizes an illustrated art history lecture to be delivered in a public forum at the end of the semester. Requirements also include journal assignment and attendance at two professional art history lectures. Can be repeated once for credit. Prerequisites: two 200-level art history courses and permission of the instructor. 
Fall semester, repeated spring semester. Husch, Oettinger.

ART 370 - Directed Studies in Art History (3)
Essentially courses without class meetings, directed studies permit the student to work in periods and problems in art not treated in courses. Prerequisites: ART 103, two 200-level courses in art history, and permission of instructor. 
Fall semester, repeated spring semester. Husch, Oettinger.

ART 373 - Independent Work in Art History (3)
Research or study of a narrowly limited topic in art history or criticism, preferably one initiated in a course taken earlier. Prerequisites: ART 103, at least two 200-level courses in art history, and permission of the instructor; preferably senior standing. 
Fall semester, repeated spring semester. Husch, Oettinger.

ART 382 - Special Topics in Art History (3)
A seminar devoted to different aspects of the history of art. Examination of a variety of art-historical periods, methodologies, and critical approaches. Prerequisite: one 200-level art history course, junior standing, or permission of the instructor. 
Fall semester, Oettinger, Spring semester, Prosperetti.

ART 386 - Women, Art, and Society (3)
(WS 386) An examination of the role women have played as producers and consumers and as the subject matter of the visual arts in the Western tradition. Emphasis on the treatment of women's contributions to the visual arts and on issues of gender and ideology within the discipline of art history. Prerequisite: one 200-level art history course, junior standing, or permission of the instructor. 
Spring semester. Offered 2013/14 and alternate years. Husch.

ART 395 - The Art History Thesis (3)
Directed study in which a student begins with a research paper already written and evaluated for any 200- or 300-level art history course. The semester is spent working closely with the instructor to rethink, research, revise and expand the paper into an approximately 35-page thesis. This course is not a Senior Thesis as offered in other departments and does not follow those registration procedures. Prerequisite: ART 249, any additional 200 or 300-level art history course, and permission of the instructor.
Offered Fall semester, repeated Spring. Husch, Oettinger.