AMS 205. ISSUES IN AMERICAN STUDIES (3)
This foundation course introduces students to both the historical and the theoretical dimensions of American studies. The course will emphasize the variety of projects being done in the field, including those that examine questions of nationhood and national identity, ethnography, gender, and popular culture. The course focuses on the characteristics that these projects share, including the commitment to interdisciplinarity, study of the connections and disconnections between elite and popular forms, and the examination of the role of the intellectual in cultural practice. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.
Spring semester, Marchand, offered 2011/12 and alternate years.

AMS 210. AMERICAN PLACES WITH WILDERNESS PLACES (3) (GEN. ED. #11)
Almost no one today disputes the importance of preserving wild tracts of land. While there's disagreement about the size, location and uses of wilderness areas, it's hard to imagine anyone arguing that we should open every acre in America to development. This shared conviction that there's something valuable about wilderness is of fairly recent origin. For example, the very mountains that we celebrate for their majestic beauty were once viewed as "ugly protuberances" that defaced the natural landscape. This course will examine America's changing perceptions of wild landscapes, from the early settlers, who viewed the "howling wilderness" as the devil's den, to our own view of wilderness areas as places of recreation. This examination of how writers, visual artists, philosophers, and early environmentalists changed America's attitudes towards wild landscape offers a striking case study in how our relationship to nature is shaped by culture.
Variable. Department.

AMS 290. INTERNSHIP (3-4)
Department.

AMS 299. INDEPENDENT WORK (3-4)
Department.

100- and 200-Level Courses

I. Power and Responsibility

EC 227. BUSINESS AND GOVERNMENT (3)
Analysis of the role of government in regulating business, especially oligopoly and monopoly social costs and benefits of various types of market structure. Examination of antitrust policy and environmental and safety regulations. Prerequisite: EC 101.
Spring semester. Variable years. Harris.

ED 215. ISSUES IN EDUCATION (3) (GEN. ED. #10)
Analysis of current issues in education, including educational policies, accountability, mainstreaming, role of education in society, multicultural education, postmodernism, critical pedagogy, testing, teacher training, urban education, women and education, and education as a profession. Prerequisite: one course in education or the social sciences.
Spring semester. Velder.

HIS 110. AMERICAN SOCIETY AND CULTURE: 1607-1876 (3) (GEN. ED. #4 AND #10)(LER-TXT AND DIV)
Significant cultural, political, and social themes during the first two-and-a-half centuries of the American past. Autobiographies and visual materials, as well as traditional sources used to develop central themes and issues in American history.
Fall semester, repeated spring semester. Baker and Hale.

HIS 262. INDIANS IN THE UNITED STATES (3) (PCE 262/SOC 262) (GEN. ED. #4)
Using comparative analysis of indigenous and non-indigenous societies, this course will examine indigenous forms of government and social structure pre-1492 to the present. Prerequisite: one course in history, peace studies, or sociology, and sophomore standing.
Spring semester. Offered 2010-11 and alternate years. Department.

PCE 148. NONVIOLENCE (4)
Survey of the theory and practice of nonviolent actions and principles, study of the philosophical principles of nonviolence in relation to current and historical events and policies, considering the possibilities for future applications, and assessing the justifications, successes, and/or failure of the policies.
Fall semester. Hopper.

PSC 202. CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL THOUGHT (3)
This course is designed to introduce students to political writings of contemporary political thinkers who influenced the course of contemporary political theory. For the most part, the texts tackle issues that present a challenge to the liberal paradigm. Such issues include postmodern theories of power, feminism, conservatism, and Islamism. The thinkers whose works we will be exploring include Nietzsche, Leo Strauss, Hannah Arendt, Michel Foucault, Franz Fanon, Sayyid Qutb, and Carole Pateman. Prerequisite: PSC 101, PSC 111, or one course in philosophy or religion, or sophomore standing.
Every third semester. Templer.

PSC 270. AMERICAN CONSTITUTIONAL LAW (3)
The role of the U.S. Supreme Court in the American political system. Analysis of Supreme Court decisions in the following areas: the presidency, the Congress, the federal system, and the U.S. economy. Prerequisite: PSC 101 or 102, or permission of the instructor.
Fall semester. Not offered in 2012. Department.

PSC 271. CIVIL RIGHTS IN THE AMERICAN CONSTITUTIONAL SYSTEM (3)
Analysis of U.S. Supreme Court cases in the following areas: the nature of citizenship and the equal protection of the laws; freedom of speech and the right of association; state-church issues; selected problems in criminal due process. Prerequisite: PSC 111 or 113, or permission of the instructor.
Spring semester. Not offered in 2012. Department.

SOC 228. SOCIAL PROBLEMS (3)
A critical examination of social problems in contemporary America and the theoretical and practical approaches to their solution. Special emphasis on problems generated by social and technological change and by the accompanying stress placed on individuals, institutions, societies, and the environment. Prerequisite: SOC 106 or ANT 107.
Fall semester. Offered 2011-12 and alternate years. Department.

SOC 245. WEALTH, POWER, AND PRESTIGE (3)
Exploration of the origins, nature, and functions of social inequality, focusing on the processes that produce and maintain inequalities in wealth, power, privilege, and prestige in modern societies. Comparative analysis of objective and subjective consequences of class and caste stratification systems. Relative impact of class, race, gender, or ethnic differences on life opportunities. Prerequisite: SOC 106 or ANT 107 or one 200-level social science course.
Fall semester. Offered 2012-13 and alternate years. Shope.

SOC 250. CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)
Examines the criminal justice system and provides an overview of basic issues in the sociological study of crime and corrections. Relying on the premise that law, crime, and the institutions of social control can be understood only as part of the larger social context, explores crime in the streets, the business world, and the family. Theories on the origin of crime, the causes of criminal behavior, and the evolution of criminal law provide the framework for discussion of special topics that include the demography of crime, women in the criminal justice system, domestic violence and the law, and the criminology of drunken drivers. Course assignments include a visit to a prison and/or a ride with a police officer. Not open to students who complete SOC 280. Prerequisite: SOC 106 or ANT 107 or sophomore standing.
Fall semester. Offered 2012-13 and alternate years. Mullaney.

WS 100. CONFRONTING INEQUALITY: WOMEN IN CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN SOCIETY (3) (LER - DIV)
An interdisciplinary examination of contemporary women's experience drawing on a variety of sources-scholarly journals, autobiography, fiction, poetry, political analysis-with an emphasis on racial and ethnic diversity. Focus is on issues such as sexualities, labor force, family, motherhood, education, cultural images, health, sexual violence, and political activism.
Fall semester. Department.

WS 225. WOMEN AND SEXUALITY (4)
An interdisciplinary examination of theories of women's sexuality and their impact on specific 19th- and 20th-century sociopolitical movements and issues, such as voluntary motherhood, prostitution, white slavery, social purity, trans-sexualism, and sexual preference. Prerequisite: WS 100 or 150 or sophomore standing.
Fall semester. Offered 2012-13 and alternate years. Department.

WS 240. WOMEN, WAR, AND PEACE (3)
An interdisciplinary examination of the female experience of war and efforts toward peace, from women's historical response to armed aggression to the contemporary feminist response to the threat of nuclear war. Examination of essays, novels, speeches, and historical works written by women about every aspect of war and peace work; exploration of the traditional treatment and analysis of women's involvement in war and the peace movement. Prerequisite: WS 100 or 150 or sophomore standing.
Spring semester. Offered 2013-14 and alternate years. Department.

WS 260. WOMEN AND THE LAW (3) (PSC 260)
Focus on current issues involving women and the law including family law, reproductive rights, violence against women, employment, pregnancy, pensions, sexual harassment, sex discrimination, and women in poverty. Prerequisite: WS 100 or 150 or sophomore standing.
Fall semester. Offered 2012-13 and alternate years. Department.

II. Identity

ENG 249. THE LEGACY OF SLAVERY (3) (GEN. ED. #4 AND #10)
In this interdisciplinary course on African-American literature, culture, and history students will examine the impact and legacy of slavery on the experiences of all Americans, but particularly African Americans as they negotiate and define "freedom" for themselves throughout history. The theme of enslavement will be explored from the American Colonial period to the present in literary genres that include slave narratives, poetry, drama, fiction, nonfiction, and science fiction. Authors include Butler, Chesnutt, Douglass, Hansberry, Ellison, and Wright. Prerequisite: college writing proficiency, permission of the instructor, or sophomore standing.
Variable semester. Robinson.

ENG 256. MULTIETHNIC AMERICAN LITERATURE (GEN. ED. #9) (LER-TXT AND DIV)
An examination of literature written by Americans of various ethnic and racial backgrounds. Works studied may include Native American tales, Sui Sin Far, Anzia, Yezierska, Rudolfo Anaya, and Maxine Hong Kingston. Course also discusses theories of ethnic literature and immigrant experience. Prerequisite: college writing proficiency.
Variable semesters. Tokarczyk, Robinson.

ENG 275. LITERATURE OF THE HARLEM RENAISSANCE (3) (GEN. ED. #4 AND #10) (LER-TXT AND DIV)
Poetry and fiction conventionally assigned to the Harlem Renaissance. Authors include Hughes, Hurston, Cullen, McKay, and others. Discussion of the delineation of the movement's boundaries, both temporally and by subject, the construction and reconstruction of a racial identity, and the tension between a progressive literary movement and the "masses" it would represent. The approach will be interdisciplinary. Fulfills American studies elective. Prerequisite: college writing proficiency.
Fall semester. Robinson.

HIS 234. ENGLAND AND COLONIAL AMERICA: 1600-1763 (3)
Trans-Atlantic perspective on pre-industrial society and culture of 17th- and 18th-century England and America. Topics include social structure, demographic trends, labor systems, family life, religion, and political culture. Prerequisite: HIS 110 or 116 or sophomore standing.
Fall semester. Offered 2009-10 and alternate years. Jeffrey and Sheller.

HIS 235. AMERICAN REVOLUTION (4)
This course surveys the major developments in American society from the end of the Seven Years' War to the inauguration of American constitutional government. Topics to be discussed include: internal disputes over the meaning of liberty and equality, the nature and consequences of the military conflict, the impact of the American Revolution on slaves and Native Americans, the significance of the American rebellion within the Atlantic world, and the struggle over and ratification of the Constitution. Prerequisite: any 100-level history course, sophomore standing.
Variable semesters. Hale.

HIS 260. CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION: 1850-1876 (3)
Conflict and change in 19th-century America, with attention to slavery, the Civil War, and Reconstruction. Prerequisite: HIS 110 or 111 or sophomore standing.
Fall semester. Offered 2010-11 and alternate years. Hale.

HIS 269. Women in India and the United States [Need description - not in catalogue]

MUS 109. THE HISTORY OF JAZZ (3) (ARTS) (GEN. ED. #4 AND #10)
A historical and practical study of jazz, including consideration of the different styles of improvisation, arranging, and various concepts of jazz. Live demonstrations and opportunities for student participation.
Fall semester. Chappell.

PSC 205. AMERICAN POLITICAL THOUGHT (3)
An examination of both historical and contemporary texts to explore American thought about politics. Focus on how recurrent themes-piety, revolution, democracy, individualism, capitalism-have shaped American political culture. Thinkers include Roger Williams, Thomas Paine, James Madison, R.W. Emerson, Henry Thoreau, Thorstein Veblen, Emma Goldman, and contemporary counterparts. Prerequisite: PSC 101, PSC 111, or one course in American history, or permission of the instructor.
Variable semesters. Templer.

PSC 242. PUBLIC OPINION, PROPAGANDA, AND THE MASS MEDIA (3)
Approaches to and content of American public opinion and the linkage between public opinion and public policy. Emphasis on the influence of the mass media on American public opinion and politics. Prerequisite: PSC 102 or 113.
Variable semesters. Department.

PSC 243. THE AMERICAN POLITICAL SYSTEM (3)
An overview of the American national political system with attention to political culture, voting behavior, interest groups, political parties, public opinion, Congress, and the presidency. Prerequisite: PSC 102 or PSC 113.
Spring semester. Offered 2009-10 and alternate years. Kasniunas.

RLG 238. Religion and Race in America [Need description - not in catalogue]

SOC 220. COMPARATIVE RACE AND ETHNIC RELATIONS (4) (LER-DIV)
Race and ethnicity in comparative perspective. Origins, processes, and consequences of antagonistic relations between racial and ethnic majority and minority groups. Social causes of prejudice and discrimination. Prerequisite: SOC 106 or ANT 107.
Fall semester. Offered 2011-12 and alternate years. Mullaney and Burton.

SOC 260. DEVIANCE AND SOCIAL CONTROL (3)
Exploration of particular kinds of rule-violating behavior such as insanity, crime, and sexual deviance; stigmatization and labeling; the creation and maintenance of deviant identities; consequences of social control of deviants for individual liberties and for society. Prerequisite: SOC 106 or ANT 107.
Fall semester. Offered 2012-13 and alternate years. Mullaney.

WS 230. CONTEMPORARY FEMINISMS: DIVERSE VOICES (3) (LER-DIV)
An examination of feminists' analyses of women's status in America since the 1960s. This course focuses on issues raised and analytic frameworks used by Latina, African American, Native American, Asian American, and European American women in seeking to improve women's status and in theorizing gender inequalities. Prerequisite: WS 100 or 150 or sophomore standing.
Spring semester. Offered 2011-12 and alternate years. Department.

III. The Natural and Human-Made Environment

ART 278. EUROPEAN AND AMERICAN ARCHITECTURE, 1750-1850 (3) (HIS 278) (GEN. ED. #4 AND #9)
Introduction to architectural theory and practice in Europe and North America from the middle of the 18th through the middle of the 19th century. Neoclassicism, 19th-century revival and eclectic styles, new metal technologies. A brief overview of Colonial American architecture before 1750. Prerequisite: ART 103 or permission of instructor.
Spring semester. Offered 2011-12 and alternate years. Husch.

HIS 271. BALTIMORE AS TOWN AND CITY (3)
Investigation of Baltimore history through field trips and primary sources with special attention to the colonial, Civil War, and modern periods. Prerequisite: one 100-level history course (HIS 110 or 111 recommended) or sophomore standing.
Variable semesters. Sheller.

HP 290. PRACTICUM IN HISTORIC PRESERVATION (1.5-4)
Students are placed in museums, preservation organizations, historical societies, governmental agencies, and at historic sites for practical experience. May be taken for letter grade or pass/no pass. Prerequisites: sophomore standing and HP 110, or permission of the program director.
Department.

WS 265. LAW, ETHICS, AND PUBLIC POLICY: CURRENT ISSUES (3) (GEN. ED. #10) (LER-TXT)
An examination of the legal, ethical, and public policy questions raised by controversial contemporary issues. Topic: abortion and reproductive technology. Focus on the impact of these issues on women's lives. Prerequisite: WS 100 or 150 or sophomore standing.
Fall semester. Offered 2011-12 and alternate years. Department.

IV. Cultural and Social Expression

ART 284. FINE ART IN AMERICA (3) (GEN. ED. #4 AND #9)
Painting and sculpture produced in the United States, from the Colonial period to the Civil War, examined in the context of social and cultural developments. Consideration of the relationship of American art to European and non-Western traditions and exploration of the particularly American ideals and myths of national and artistic self-definition. Prerequisite: ART 103 or permission of instructor.
Spring semester. Offered 2012-13 and alternate years. Husch.

COM 213. MAKING SENSE OF POPULAR CULTURE (3) (GEN. ED. #10) (LER - DIV)
Popular culture: We eat, breathe, wear, play, learn, and live it. From McDonald's to MTV, this course traces the postwar development of American popular/consumer culture, emphasizing its penetration into and ubiquity in our everyday lives; its influence on self, group, and national identity; its place in the establishment of our contemporary sense of community; and its global reach. The course addresses issues of race, gender, class, and other factors that are both shaped and reflected by popular culture myths, icons, and formulas. Prerequisites: sophomore standing; COM 105, and certified college writing proficiency, or permission of instructor.
Spring semester. Peroutka, Zurawik.

COM 219. HISTORY OF TELEVISION AND RADIO (4) (GEN. ED. #4 AND #9) (LER-TXT)
An examination of the historical evolution of electronic media in the United States and other countries. Radio, television, and new media technologies are investigated from a number of perspectives, including technology, business and industry, programming, law, and society and culture. Prerequisites: COM 105 and college writing proficiency or permission of the instructor.
Spring semester. Offered alternate years. Marcus.

COM 234. CRITICAL ANALYSIS OF JOURNALISM (3) (GEN. ED. #9)
Examination of the economic, political, social, and psychological forces that have created the cultural context in which journalists operate nationally and internationally. Both the process (journalistic routines and institutional influences) and the products (broadcast and print news stories) are examined critically. Prerequisites: COM 105 and certified college writing proficiency or permission of the instructor.
Fall or spring semester. Zurawik, Peroutka.

COM 237. MEDIA CRITICISM (3) (GEN. ED. #9 AND #10) (LER - TXT)
This course examines the critical and theoretical approaches to understanding the televisual world. From formalist to feminist and postmodernist theory, students gain an in-depth understanding of the codes and conventions that govern the cultural production of television. Ideological, genrebased, auteurist, and other approaches are examined. Prerequisites: COM 105 and certified college writing proficiency, or permission of the instructor.
Fall semester. Burton, Zurawik, Marcus.

DAN 131. CHORÉGRAPHIE ANTIQUE (FORMERLY DAN 195) (1.5) (GEN. ED. #4 AND #9 WITH DAN 231) (LER - ARC)
Introduction to performance of ballroom and theatrical dances of the 15th through 20th centuries. Performances include concerts, lecture-demonstrations, and first-person interpretations of dance and social history in living history museums throughout Maryland. Prerequisites: audition and acceptance by artistic director. Repeatable up to six credits.
Fall semester. Bond.

DAN 231. CHORÉGRAPHIE ANTIQUE II (1.5) (GEN. ED. #4 AND #9 WITH DAN 131) 
Advanced performance of ballroom and theatrical dances of the 15th through 20th centuries. Performances include concerts, lecture-demonstrations, and first-person interpretations of dance and social history in living history museums throughout Maryland. Prerequisite: permission of artistic director. DAN 131 Repeatable up to six credits.
Fall semester. Bond.

DAN 250. TWENTIETH-CENTURY AMERICAN DANCE AND ITS RELATION TO OTHER MODERN ARTS (3) (GEN. ED. #8 AND #9)
Development of 20th-century American dance, from Isadora Duncan to avant-garde dancers of the 1990s, within a historical and cultural context considering 20th-century dance in relation to similar elements of composition in other art forms. Prerequisites: DAN 114 and 120, previous experience in dance at the elementary level, or permission of the instructor.
Spring semester. Offered 2011-12 and every third year. Bond.

DAN 255. AMERICAN DANCE TRADITIONS (3) (GEN. ED. #4 AND #9)
The study of American dance traditions of Native Americans, African Americans, Anglo-Americans, and European Americans, and American musical theatre as an embodiment of American history and culture. Prerequisite: DAN 114 or 120, some previous experience in dance at the elementary level, or permission of the instructor.
Spring semester. Offered 2013-14 and every third year. Bond.

ED 210. DEVELOPMENT OF EDUCATION IN THE UNITED STATES (3)
Educational theories and practices in America from the 17th century to the present, in relation to social, economic, political, and intellectual forces. Consideration of inequality in educational opportunities for women and racial and ethnic groups. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of the instructor
Spring semester. Velder.

ENG 250. AMERICAN LITERATURE I (3)
This course explores issues of nationality, spirituality, race, gender and sexuality from the Colonial Period to the Civil War in literary genres that include letters, journals, essays, poetry, the sermon, autobiography, short story, novel, and the slave narrative. Prerequisite: college writing proficiency.
Fall semester. Offered 2011-2012. Robinson.

ENG 254. AMERICAN LITERATURE II (3) (GEN. ED. #4 AND #9)
This course traces developments in American Literature from the 1880s through the 1920s, a period dominated by the rags-to-riches plot. Students will explore how writers such as Alger (Ragged Dick), Twain (Puddn'head Wilson), Dreiser (Sister Carrie), James (Daisy Miller), Wharton (The House of Mirth), Chopin (The Awakening), Chesnutt (The Passing of Grandison), Norris (McTeague), and Burroughs (Tarzan) obsessively reworked this plot, even as they grappled with the moral costs of social ambition and the obstacles that women, minorities, and the lower classes faced in their struggle upward. Prerequisite: college writing proficiency.
Spring semester. Marchand.

ENG 255. THE MODERN AMERICAN NOVEL (3) (GEN. ED. #9)
Studies of modern American fiction. Special topics. Announced prior to registration.
Variable semesters. Cordish.

ENG 276. MODERN POETRY (3) (GEN. ED. #4 AND #9)
An exploration of works by British and American poets of the early 20th century in their historical, intellectual, and cultural context. Yeats, Pound, Eliot, Auden, Stevens, Moore, Frost, and their contemporaries. Prerequisite: Frontiers or sophomore standing.
Variable semesters. Tokarczyk.

ENG 277. CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN POETS (3) (GEN. ED. #9)
Major writers representing various schools, regions, and ethnic groups. Particular attention will be paid to the historical and cultural context of the work. Lowell, Ginsberg, Ashbery, Rich, and others. Prerequisite: Frontiers or sophomore standing.
Variable semesters. Tokarczyk.

HIS 242. FROM PURITAN DIARIES TO OPRAH'S BOOK CLUB: READERS AND WRITERS IN AMERICAN HISTORY (3)
Using insights gleaned from various disciplines, this course examines the history of reading and writing in America. In particular, we will study how written texts are produced, disseminated, and consumed. Topics include: Indians and the discovery of print; the sentimental novel; slave narratives; religious readers; the making of an American literary canon; comic books in modern America; and, of course, Oprah's book club. Prerequisites HIS 110 or 111 or sophomore standing.
Variable semesters. Hale.

THE 211. HISTORY OF AMERICAN THEATRE AND DRAMA (3) (GEN. ED. #9)
The evolution of the American stage and its indigenous drama, including the development of the American musical theatre, melodrama, African American drama, and the work of such theatres as the Provincetown Players and the Group Theatre. The course will also examine works outside the theatrical mainstream, including feminist theatre, American avant-garde, and gay theatre. This course explores the social and historical contexts that influence theatrical and dramatic styles.
Fall semester. Offered 2012-13 and every three years. Free.

SOC 271. PROTEST! LEGACY OF THE SIXTIES (4) (GEN. ED. #4)
An examination of protest movements in the United States during the 1960s. Films, music, literature, and firsthand reports are used to depict the mood and legacy of the time. Explores the struggles for civil rights; black power; women's liberation; the New Left and anti-war protest; and the broader countercultural rebellion as reflected in psychedelics, the hippie phenomenon, and revolutionary activity. These subjects form the backdrop for consideration of recent protest activity. Prerequisite: SOC 106 or ANT 107 or sophomore standing.
Spring semester. Offered 2011-12 and alternate years. Burton.

300-LEVEL COURSES

I. Power and Responsibility

COM 342. Communication Law and Regulation [Need description - not in catalogue]

PSC 316. SEMINAR IN SCOPE AND METHOD IN POLITICAL SCIENCE (3)
What is politics and how should we study it? Review of competing views. Emphasis on some of the classics in the field. Prerequisite: PSC 101 and 102, and senior standing.
Spring semester. Department.

PSC 342. SEMINAR IN PRESIDENTIAL POLITICS (3)
Examination of the modern presidency and its transformation into what many are calling the "postmodern" presidency, and the issues this change poses for American political culture and the political system in the new millennium. Prerequisites: PSC 101 or 113, one 200-level course in American politics, or permission of instructor.
Variable semesters. Kasniunas.

PSC 343. SEMINAR IN CONGRESSIONAL POLITICS (3)
A study of the legislative branch in the American system of government. This course considers the incentives and goals of members of Congress and the nature of institutional arrangements. Special attention is given to the changes and reforms occurring since 1995 and their implications for policy-making. Prerequisites: PSC 101 or 113, and one 200-level course in American politics, or permission of instructor.
Variable semesters. Kasniunas.

II. Identity II

PSC 322. American Philosophy [Need description - not in catalogue]

III. The Natural and Human-Made Environment

ART 347. SEMINAR IN HISTORIC PRESERVATION AND ARCHITECTURE (4) (HP 320)
Development of American architecture since 1880, including the influence of construction technology, building systems, materials, building codes, and construction financing on the design of buildings. The preservation and conservation of 20th-century materials and artifacts will also be addressed. Prerequisites: ART 278 or HP 110, 210, 220, 230, and ART 278/HIS 278 or permission of the instructor.
Variable semesters. Department.

IV. Cultural and Social Expression

COM 340. MEDIA, POLITICS, AND CIVIC ENGAGEMENT (3)
This course focuses on the ways in which citizens develop knowledge of, engage with, and practice politics through mass media and personal media forms in contemporary American society. Students examine historical and contemporary practices of civic engagement and political organizing via media such as the alternative press, talk radio, rebel radio, editorials, fax machines, the Internet, cinematic representations, public-access television, and others. Students develop an understanding of the power available to citizens for political engagement in the world via mediated communication forms. Prerequisites: at least two of the required 200-level theory/criticism and history courses or two 200-level political science courses, departmental and college writing proficiency, and junior or senior status or permission of instructor.
Fall semester. Offered alternate years. Marcus.

COM 342. Communication Law and Regulation [Need description - not listed]

HIS 305. THE PERSONAL NARRATIVE IN AMERICAN HISTORY AND CULTURE (4) (GEN. ED. #7)
Personal narratives, which include autobiographies, diaries, letters and recollections, offer vivid insights into American life and culture. This course explores a variety of personal narratives, from captivity tales of the 17th century and slave narratives of the 19th century to The Autobiography of Malcolm X. Prerequisites: two 200-level courses in American or European history or American studies or permission of the instructor.
Fall semester. Offered 2011-12. Jeffrey.

HIS 338. SEMINAR IN MODERN EUROPEAN AND AMERICAN HISTORY (4)
Directed readings and independent research on some aspect of modern European and/or American history resulting in a seminar paper. Prerequisites: HIS 110 or 111, HIS 116 or 117, or two of the following: HIS 215, 224, 260, 265; and one other 200 level course in American and European history or permission of the instructor.
Spring semester. Baker.

ENG 371. SEMINAR IN AMERICAN LITERATURE (3)
Topic for 2011-2012: Herman Melville's Moby-Dick
Fall semester. Marchand.

ENG 372. SEMINAR IN AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE (3)
Topic: The African American Novel-an examination of thematic, structural, and stylistic characteristics of the African American novel from its rise in the 19th century through contemporary works. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and a course in literature, or permission of the instructor.
Spring semester. Robinson.